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Infant and adult visual attention during an imitation demonstration.

Taylor G, Herbert JS - Dev Psychobiol (2013)

Bottom Line: Infants aged 6, 9, and 12 months, and an adult comparison group, watched a video of a puppet imitation demonstration while visual behavior was recorded on an eye tracker.In contrast, adults directed their gaze primarily to the puppet.When infants were tested for their behavioral recall of the target actions, "imitators" were shown to have increased attention to the person and decreased attention to the background compared to "non-imitators." These results suggest that attention during learning is related to memory outcome and that changes in attention may be one mechanism by which manipulations to the learning event may enhance infant recall memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK.

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Proportion of fixations (±1 SE) to each AOI during the experimental video as a function of target action demonstrated and age of the participant.
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fig03: Proportion of fixations (±1 SE) to each AOI during the experimental video as a function of target action demonstrated and age of the participant.

Mentions: The ANOVA also showed a significant AOI and action interaction, F(4, 240) = 23.15, p = .000, η2 = .50. Overall, attention to the puppet remained relatively stable across each action (“Off” M = 17.23%, SE = 1.98; “Shake” M = 14.80%, SE = 1.77; “On” M = 14.17%, SE = 1.97). Similarly, attention to the background remained relatively low across each action (“Off” M = 1.42%, SE = .36; “Shake” M = .88%, SE = .19; “On” M = 1.51%, SE = .41). Attention to the person however, increased for the “Shake” action (M = 14.75%, SE = 1.87) compared to the “Off” (M = 5.73%, SE = .76) and “On” actions (M = 4.01%, SE = .61). Thus, participants increased attention to the person when watching the “Shake” action. There was also a significant three-way interaction effect between action, AOI, and age group, F(12, 240) = 2.95, p = .001, η2 = .31 (see Fig. 3), showing that the interaction between action and AOI is different across age groups. Specifically, the infant age groups looked primarily at the person during the “Shake” action. In contrast, adults looked primarily at the puppet during each action, although attention to the person increased during the “Shake” action. Thus, adults focused on the puppet region, whilst infants focused on the person during the “Shake” action.


Infant and adult visual attention during an imitation demonstration.

Taylor G, Herbert JS - Dev Psychobiol (2013)

Proportion of fixations (±1 SE) to each AOI during the experimental video as a function of target action demonstrated and age of the participant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209116&req=5

fig03: Proportion of fixations (±1 SE) to each AOI during the experimental video as a function of target action demonstrated and age of the participant.
Mentions: The ANOVA also showed a significant AOI and action interaction, F(4, 240) = 23.15, p = .000, η2 = .50. Overall, attention to the puppet remained relatively stable across each action (“Off” M = 17.23%, SE = 1.98; “Shake” M = 14.80%, SE = 1.77; “On” M = 14.17%, SE = 1.97). Similarly, attention to the background remained relatively low across each action (“Off” M = 1.42%, SE = .36; “Shake” M = .88%, SE = .19; “On” M = 1.51%, SE = .41). Attention to the person however, increased for the “Shake” action (M = 14.75%, SE = 1.87) compared to the “Off” (M = 5.73%, SE = .76) and “On” actions (M = 4.01%, SE = .61). Thus, participants increased attention to the person when watching the “Shake” action. There was also a significant three-way interaction effect between action, AOI, and age group, F(12, 240) = 2.95, p = .001, η2 = .31 (see Fig. 3), showing that the interaction between action and AOI is different across age groups. Specifically, the infant age groups looked primarily at the person during the “Shake” action. In contrast, adults looked primarily at the puppet during each action, although attention to the person increased during the “Shake” action. Thus, adults focused on the puppet region, whilst infants focused on the person during the “Shake” action.

Bottom Line: Infants aged 6, 9, and 12 months, and an adult comparison group, watched a video of a puppet imitation demonstration while visual behavior was recorded on an eye tracker.In contrast, adults directed their gaze primarily to the puppet.When infants were tested for their behavioral recall of the target actions, "imitators" were shown to have increased attention to the person and decreased attention to the background compared to "non-imitators." These results suggest that attention during learning is related to memory outcome and that changes in attention may be one mechanism by which manipulations to the learning event may enhance infant recall memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus