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Morbidity in survivors of child and adolescent meningioma.

Kotecha RS, Jacoby P, Cole CH, Gottardo NG - Cancer (2013)

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis identified relapse as the only independent variable associated with an increased risk of morbidity (odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.11-7.65; P ≤ .001).Subgroup analysis identified a higher incidence of morbidity among patients who had intracranial tumors with a skull base location compared with a nonskull base location (P ≤ .001).Timing at which morbidity occurred was available for 70 patients, with persistence of preoperative tumor-related symptoms in 67% and as a result of therapy in 20%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Haematology and Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Telethon Institute for Child Health Research and Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

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The selection of studies and patient data are illustrated.
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fig01: The selection of studies and patient data are illustrated.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the selection of studies and patient data. Forty-six studies initially were identified,8–53 5 of which were excluded49–53 because they reported duplicate data. Morbidity was reported in 21 studies,8–28 all of which were exclusive to children and adolescents. Ten patients who had meningiomas that could not be categorized histologically according to the 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system54 (eg, angioblastic, sclerosing) or that were of unknown histology were excluded. Eleven patients with radiation-induced meningioma, 24 patients for whom outcome was unknown, and 3 patients24 for whom there were duplicate data in another included publication25 also were excluded. Of the remaining 326 patients, 52 had died, leaving 274 patients who were eligible for the selection of individual patient data.


Morbidity in survivors of child and adolescent meningioma.

Kotecha RS, Jacoby P, Cole CH, Gottardo NG - Cancer (2013)

The selection of studies and patient data are illustrated.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209112&req=5

fig01: The selection of studies and patient data are illustrated.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the selection of studies and patient data. Forty-six studies initially were identified,8–53 5 of which were excluded49–53 because they reported duplicate data. Morbidity was reported in 21 studies,8–28 all of which were exclusive to children and adolescents. Ten patients who had meningiomas that could not be categorized histologically according to the 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system54 (eg, angioblastic, sclerosing) or that were of unknown histology were excluded. Eleven patients with radiation-induced meningioma, 24 patients for whom outcome was unknown, and 3 patients24 for whom there were duplicate data in another included publication25 also were excluded. Of the remaining 326 patients, 52 had died, leaving 274 patients who were eligible for the selection of individual patient data.

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis identified relapse as the only independent variable associated with an increased risk of morbidity (odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.11-7.65; P ≤ .001).Subgroup analysis identified a higher incidence of morbidity among patients who had intracranial tumors with a skull base location compared with a nonskull base location (P ≤ .001).Timing at which morbidity occurred was available for 70 patients, with persistence of preoperative tumor-related symptoms in 67% and as a result of therapy in 20%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Haematology and Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Telethon Institute for Child Health Research and Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus