Limits...
Tea consumption is inversely related to 5-year blood pressure change among adults in Jiangsu, China: a cross-sectional study.

Tong X, Taylor AW, Giles L, Wittert GA, Shi Z - Nutr J (2014)

Bottom Line: There was a significant interaction between smoking and total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change.The inverse association between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change was significant only in non-smokers.The consumption of green tea is inversely associated with 5-year BP change among Chinese adults, an effect abrogated by smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, 122 Frome Street, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia. zumin.shi@adelaide.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Data relating to the association between tea consumption and blood pressure change are inconsistent. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between tea consumption and the change in blood pressure (BP) in Chinese adults over a 5-year period.

Methods: Data from 1109 Chinese men (N= 472) and women (N= 637) who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN) were analysed. BP was measured in 2002 and 2007. Tea (green, black and total tea) consumption was quantitatively assessed at the follow-up survey in 2007.

Results: Total tea and green tea consumption were inversely associated with 5-year diastolic BP (DBP) but not systolic BP (SBP) change. In the multivariable analysis, compared with no consumption of tea, those with daily total tea/green tea consumption of at least10 g had 2.41 mmHg and 3.68 mmHg smaller increase of DBP respectively. There was a significant interaction between smoking and total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change. The inverse association between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change was significant only in non-smokers. Green tea consumption was inversely associated with SBP change only in non-smokers and those without central obesity.

Conclusion: The consumption of green tea is inversely associated with 5-year BP change among Chinese adults, an effect abrogated by smoking.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicted association between green tea consumption and blood pressure changes over 5 years among Chinese adultsa. Command marginsplot was used to generate the graph. Green tea intake was treated as continuous variables. 11 participants with tea consumption more than 22 g/day were excluded. aModels adjusted for variables in model 3 of Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209085&req=5

Fig3: Predicted association between green tea consumption and blood pressure changes over 5 years among Chinese adultsa. Command marginsplot was used to generate the graph. Green tea intake was treated as continuous variables. 11 participants with tea consumption more than 22 g/day were excluded. aModels adjusted for variables in model 3 of Table 2.

Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show the association between total tea/green tea consumption (as continuous variables) and BP changes with adjustment for all covariates. There was a dose–response relationship between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change but not SBP change. The confidence intervals were wider at the right end due to the small number of participants with high tea consumption.Table 2


Tea consumption is inversely related to 5-year blood pressure change among adults in Jiangsu, China: a cross-sectional study.

Tong X, Taylor AW, Giles L, Wittert GA, Shi Z - Nutr J (2014)

Predicted association between green tea consumption and blood pressure changes over 5 years among Chinese adultsa. Command marginsplot was used to generate the graph. Green tea intake was treated as continuous variables. 11 participants with tea consumption more than 22 g/day were excluded. aModels adjusted for variables in model 3 of Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209085&req=5

Fig3: Predicted association between green tea consumption and blood pressure changes over 5 years among Chinese adultsa. Command marginsplot was used to generate the graph. Green tea intake was treated as continuous variables. 11 participants with tea consumption more than 22 g/day were excluded. aModels adjusted for variables in model 3 of Table 2.
Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show the association between total tea/green tea consumption (as continuous variables) and BP changes with adjustment for all covariates. There was a dose–response relationship between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change but not SBP change. The confidence intervals were wider at the right end due to the small number of participants with high tea consumption.Table 2

Bottom Line: There was a significant interaction between smoking and total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change.The inverse association between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change was significant only in non-smokers.The consumption of green tea is inversely associated with 5-year BP change among Chinese adults, an effect abrogated by smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, 122 Frome Street, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia. zumin.shi@adelaide.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Data relating to the association between tea consumption and blood pressure change are inconsistent. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between tea consumption and the change in blood pressure (BP) in Chinese adults over a 5-year period.

Methods: Data from 1109 Chinese men (N= 472) and women (N= 637) who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN) were analysed. BP was measured in 2002 and 2007. Tea (green, black and total tea) consumption was quantitatively assessed at the follow-up survey in 2007.

Results: Total tea and green tea consumption were inversely associated with 5-year diastolic BP (DBP) but not systolic BP (SBP) change. In the multivariable analysis, compared with no consumption of tea, those with daily total tea/green tea consumption of at least10 g had 2.41 mmHg and 3.68 mmHg smaller increase of DBP respectively. There was a significant interaction between smoking and total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change. The inverse association between total tea/green tea consumption and DBP change was significant only in non-smokers. Green tea consumption was inversely associated with SBP change only in non-smokers and those without central obesity.

Conclusion: The consumption of green tea is inversely associated with 5-year BP change among Chinese adults, an effect abrogated by smoking.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus