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Pharmacologic sex hormones in pregnancy in relation to offspring obesity.

Jensen ET, Longnecker MP - Obesity (Silver Spring) (2014)

Bottom Line: To assess the association between in utero exposure to either diethylstilbestrol (DES) or an oral contraceptive in pregnancy and offspring obesity.Pharmacologic sex hormone use in pregnancy may be associated with childhood obesity.Whether contemporary, lower dose oral contraceptive formulations are similarly associated with increased risk of childhood obesity is unclear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study population obtained from the prospective, Collaborative Perinatal Project pregnancy cohort (1959–1974)
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Figure 1: Study population obtained from the prospective, Collaborative Perinatal Project pregnancy cohort (1959–1974)

Mentions: The Collaborative Perinatal Project was a prospective pregnancy cohort study of 58,760 pregnancies in 48,197 women enrolled from 1959 to 1966. Women were enrolled at 12 U.S. academic medical centers during pregnancy and were followed through delivery, and their children were followed up to 7 or 8 years of age. Details of the data collection methods and study design have been described previously14. In the present study we assessed the association between use of oral contraceptives in early pregnancy (months 1–4) or use of DES throughout pregnancy (months 1–9) and offspring overweight or obesity (≥85th percentile) or obesity (≥95th percentile) at approximately age 7. We included all pregnancies resulting in a live, singleton birth (n=55,740), with complete data on study covariates and follow-up between 6 and 8 years of age (72–96 months). This resulted in a study population of 34,419 pregnancies (fig. 1) among 29,161 women. Thus, of the pregnancies that met our inclusion criteria, 38% were lost to follow-up.


Pharmacologic sex hormones in pregnancy in relation to offspring obesity.

Jensen ET, Longnecker MP - Obesity (Silver Spring) (2014)

Study population obtained from the prospective, Collaborative Perinatal Project pregnancy cohort (1959–1974)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209008&req=5

Figure 1: Study population obtained from the prospective, Collaborative Perinatal Project pregnancy cohort (1959–1974)
Mentions: The Collaborative Perinatal Project was a prospective pregnancy cohort study of 58,760 pregnancies in 48,197 women enrolled from 1959 to 1966. Women were enrolled at 12 U.S. academic medical centers during pregnancy and were followed through delivery, and their children were followed up to 7 or 8 years of age. Details of the data collection methods and study design have been described previously14. In the present study we assessed the association between use of oral contraceptives in early pregnancy (months 1–4) or use of DES throughout pregnancy (months 1–9) and offspring overweight or obesity (≥85th percentile) or obesity (≥95th percentile) at approximately age 7. We included all pregnancies resulting in a live, singleton birth (n=55,740), with complete data on study covariates and follow-up between 6 and 8 years of age (72–96 months). This resulted in a study population of 34,419 pregnancies (fig. 1) among 29,161 women. Thus, of the pregnancies that met our inclusion criteria, 38% were lost to follow-up.

Bottom Line: To assess the association between in utero exposure to either diethylstilbestrol (DES) or an oral contraceptive in pregnancy and offspring obesity.Pharmacologic sex hormone use in pregnancy may be associated with childhood obesity.Whether contemporary, lower dose oral contraceptive formulations are similarly associated with increased risk of childhood obesity is unclear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus