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Electrophysiological evidence for domain-general inhibitory control during bilingual language switching.

Liu H, Rossi S, Zhou H, Chen B - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: This paper presents an experiment that explored the role of domain-general inhibitory control on language switching.Results showed that the language switch costs of bilinguals with high-IC were symmetrical, while that of bilinguals with low-IC were not.The N2 component failed to show a significant interaction between group, language and task, indicating that inhibition may not comes into play during the language task schema competition phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents an experiment that explored the role of domain-general inhibitory control on language switching. Reaction times (RTs) and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded when low-proficient bilinguals with high and low inhibitory control (IC) switched between overt picture naming in both their L1 and L2. Results showed that the language switch costs of bilinguals with high-IC were symmetrical, while that of bilinguals with low-IC were not. The N2 component failed to show a significant interaction between group, language and task, indicating that inhibition may not comes into play during the language task schema competition phase. The late positive component (LPC), however, showed larger amplitudes for L2 repeat and switch trials than for L1 trials in the high-IC group, indicating that inhibition may play a key role during the lexical response selection phase. These findings suggest that domain-general inhibitory control plays an important role in modulating language switch costs and its influence can be specified in lexical selection phase.

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Mean latencies (ms), language switch costs, and standard errors for the high and low inhibitory control (IC) group during the EEG experiment.
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pone-0110887-g001: Mean latencies (ms), language switch costs, and standard errors for the high and low inhibitory control (IC) group during the EEG experiment.

Mentions: Mean latencies and language switch costs for the high–IC and low–IC group are shown in Figure 1.


Electrophysiological evidence for domain-general inhibitory control during bilingual language switching.

Liu H, Rossi S, Zhou H, Chen B - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mean latencies (ms), language switch costs, and standard errors for the high and low inhibitory control (IC) group during the EEG experiment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4208819&req=5

pone-0110887-g001: Mean latencies (ms), language switch costs, and standard errors for the high and low inhibitory control (IC) group during the EEG experiment.
Mentions: Mean latencies and language switch costs for the high–IC and low–IC group are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: This paper presents an experiment that explored the role of domain-general inhibitory control on language switching.Results showed that the language switch costs of bilinguals with high-IC were symmetrical, while that of bilinguals with low-IC were not.The N2 component failed to show a significant interaction between group, language and task, indicating that inhibition may not comes into play during the language task schema competition phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents an experiment that explored the role of domain-general inhibitory control on language switching. Reaction times (RTs) and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded when low-proficient bilinguals with high and low inhibitory control (IC) switched between overt picture naming in both their L1 and L2. Results showed that the language switch costs of bilinguals with high-IC were symmetrical, while that of bilinguals with low-IC were not. The N2 component failed to show a significant interaction between group, language and task, indicating that inhibition may not comes into play during the language task schema competition phase. The late positive component (LPC), however, showed larger amplitudes for L2 repeat and switch trials than for L1 trials in the high-IC group, indicating that inhibition may play a key role during the lexical response selection phase. These findings suggest that domain-general inhibitory control plays an important role in modulating language switch costs and its influence can be specified in lexical selection phase.

Show MeSH