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Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training.

Kon M, Ohiwa N, Honda A, Matsubayashi T, Ikeda T, Akimoto T, Suzuki Y, Hirano Y, Russell AP - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: The increase in muscular endurance was significantly higher in the HRT group.Plasma VEGF concentration and skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HRT group than the NRT group following training.Our results suggest that, in addition to increases in muscle size and strength, HRT may also lead to increased muscular endurance and the promotion of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sports Sciences, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, 3-15-1 Nishigaoka, KitaTokyo, Japan Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in exercise volume during leg‐press exercises at 70% of 1RM before (baseline) and after (8 weeks) the resistance training program. NRT, normoxic resistance training (n =7); HRT, hypoxic resistance training (n =9). Values are represented as means ± SE. Significantly different from baseline: **P <0.01; significantly different from NRT: #P <0.05.
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fig02: Changes in exercise volume during leg‐press exercises at 70% of 1RM before (baseline) and after (8 weeks) the resistance training program. NRT, normoxic resistance training (n =7); HRT, hypoxic resistance training (n =9). Values are represented as means ± SE. Significantly different from baseline: **P <0.01; significantly different from NRT: #P <0.05.

Mentions: Muscular endurance was evaluated as the exercise volume of bilateral leg‐press exercise performed at 70% 1RM (Figure 2). Muscular endurance significantly increased in both groups after training (P <0.01). However, the exercise volumes were significantly higher in the HRT group than in the NRT group at the posttraining time point (P <0.05) (Figure 2).


Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training.

Kon M, Ohiwa N, Honda A, Matsubayashi T, Ikeda T, Akimoto T, Suzuki Y, Hirano Y, Russell AP - Physiol Rep (2014)

Changes in exercise volume during leg‐press exercises at 70% of 1RM before (baseline) and after (8 weeks) the resistance training program. NRT, normoxic resistance training (n =7); HRT, hypoxic resistance training (n =9). Values are represented as means ± SE. Significantly different from baseline: **P <0.01; significantly different from NRT: #P <0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4208656&req=5

fig02: Changes in exercise volume during leg‐press exercises at 70% of 1RM before (baseline) and after (8 weeks) the resistance training program. NRT, normoxic resistance training (n =7); HRT, hypoxic resistance training (n =9). Values are represented as means ± SE. Significantly different from baseline: **P <0.01; significantly different from NRT: #P <0.05.
Mentions: Muscular endurance was evaluated as the exercise volume of bilateral leg‐press exercise performed at 70% 1RM (Figure 2). Muscular endurance significantly increased in both groups after training (P <0.01). However, the exercise volumes were significantly higher in the HRT group than in the NRT group at the posttraining time point (P <0.05) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The increase in muscular endurance was significantly higher in the HRT group.Plasma VEGF concentration and skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HRT group than the NRT group following training.Our results suggest that, in addition to increases in muscle size and strength, HRT may also lead to increased muscular endurance and the promotion of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sports Sciences, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, 3-15-1 Nishigaoka, KitaTokyo, Japan Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus