Limits...
When age matters: differences in facial mimicry and autonomic responses to peers' emotions in teenagers and adults.

Ardizzi M, Sestito M, Martini F, Umiltà MA, Ravera R, Gallese V - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated.Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions.Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Physiology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated. In this study we investigated whether Age-group membership could also affect implicit physiological responses, as facial mimicry and autonomic regulation, to observation of emotional facial expressions. To this aim, facial Electromyography (EMG) and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) were recorded from teenager and adult participants during the observation of facial expressions performed by teenager and adult models. Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions. The different physiological modalities through which young and adults respond to peers' emotional expressions are likely to reflect two different ways to engage in social interactions with coetaneous. Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphical representation of the experimental procedure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206508&req=5

pone-0110763-g001: Graphical representation of the experimental procedure.

Mentions: Participants were asked to abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco for 2 hours prior to the experiments [27]. Participants sat comfortably in a chair in front of a laptop screen (1024×768@75 Hz) used for stimuli presentation, located at a distance of 60 cm. Participants were invited to relax and refrain from moving during the experiment. The experiment consisted of 8 “Age-blocks” (each lasting 180 sec), 4 for each age-condition (Teenager and Adult), randomly presented (see Figure 1). During Teenager Age-blocks only Teenager-stimuli were presented. On the contrary, Adult Age-blocks consisted in Adult-stimuli only. Within each Age-block, 5 “Facial expression-blocks” (one for each facial expression: 4 emotional and 1 neutral; each lasting 36 sec), were randomly presented. In each Facial expression-block six stimuli, displaying the same facial expression performed by different models (i.e., joy, fear, anger, sadness or neutral facial expressions) were shown. Each video clip was preceded by a fixation cross lasting 0.5 sec. Participants were instructed to carefully watch the videos. In order to maintain their attention, after each Age-block participants were asked a question about the physical outlook of individuals portrayed in the videos (e.g., “Did you see a woman with curly hair?”). Two “Baseline-blocks” (each lasting 120 sec) - consisting in a black centred fixation cross placed against a gray background - were presented, one at the beginning (Baseline 1) and one at the end (Baseline 2) of the experiment. During Baseline-blocks participants were asked to watch the cross. Physiological responses (EMG and ECG) were recorded for the entire duration of the experiment, that lasted about 40 min. During the experiment participants were video-recorded.


When age matters: differences in facial mimicry and autonomic responses to peers' emotions in teenagers and adults.

Ardizzi M, Sestito M, Martini F, Umiltà MA, Ravera R, Gallese V - PLoS ONE (2014)

Graphical representation of the experimental procedure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206508&req=5

pone-0110763-g001: Graphical representation of the experimental procedure.
Mentions: Participants were asked to abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco for 2 hours prior to the experiments [27]. Participants sat comfortably in a chair in front of a laptop screen (1024×768@75 Hz) used for stimuli presentation, located at a distance of 60 cm. Participants were invited to relax and refrain from moving during the experiment. The experiment consisted of 8 “Age-blocks” (each lasting 180 sec), 4 for each age-condition (Teenager and Adult), randomly presented (see Figure 1). During Teenager Age-blocks only Teenager-stimuli were presented. On the contrary, Adult Age-blocks consisted in Adult-stimuli only. Within each Age-block, 5 “Facial expression-blocks” (one for each facial expression: 4 emotional and 1 neutral; each lasting 36 sec), were randomly presented. In each Facial expression-block six stimuli, displaying the same facial expression performed by different models (i.e., joy, fear, anger, sadness or neutral facial expressions) were shown. Each video clip was preceded by a fixation cross lasting 0.5 sec. Participants were instructed to carefully watch the videos. In order to maintain their attention, after each Age-block participants were asked a question about the physical outlook of individuals portrayed in the videos (e.g., “Did you see a woman with curly hair?”). Two “Baseline-blocks” (each lasting 120 sec) - consisting in a black centred fixation cross placed against a gray background - were presented, one at the beginning (Baseline 1) and one at the end (Baseline 2) of the experiment. During Baseline-blocks participants were asked to watch the cross. Physiological responses (EMG and ECG) were recorded for the entire duration of the experiment, that lasted about 40 min. During the experiment participants were video-recorded.

Bottom Line: Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated.Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions.Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Physiology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Age-group membership effects on explicit emotional facial expressions recognition have been widely demonstrated. In this study we investigated whether Age-group membership could also affect implicit physiological responses, as facial mimicry and autonomic regulation, to observation of emotional facial expressions. To this aim, facial Electromyography (EMG) and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) were recorded from teenager and adult participants during the observation of facial expressions performed by teenager and adult models. Results highlighted that teenagers exhibited greater facial EMG responses to peers' facial expressions, whereas adults showed higher RSA-responses to adult facial expressions. The different physiological modalities through which young and adults respond to peers' emotional expressions are likely to reflect two different ways to engage in social interactions with coetaneous. Findings confirmed that age is an important and powerful social feature that modulates interpersonal interactions by influencing low-level physiological responses.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus