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Rheumatoid arthritis increases the risk of nontuberculosis mycobacterial disease and active pulmonary tuberculosis.

Yeh JJ, Wang YC, Sung FC, Kao CH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: After adjusting for age, sex, and CCI, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of NTM disease and active PTB for the RA group were 4.17 (95% CI = 2.61-6.65) and 2.87 (95% CI = 2.55-3.23), respectively, compared with the non-RA group.In the first 2 years of follow-up, the RA group yielded corresponding adjusted HRs of 4.98 and 3.39 compared with the non-RA group.This study can serve as a reference for clinical physicians to increase awareness regarding the detection of NTM disease and active PTB in RA patients among the any stage of the clinical course even without CCI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine and Family Medicine, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan; Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have examined the association of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with nontuberculosis mycobacterium (NTM) disease and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB).

Methods: We identified 29 131 patients with RA from the catastrophic illness registry who were diagnosed from 1998-2008; 116 524 patients without RA from inpatient data files were randomly frequency matched according to sex, age, and index year and used as a comparison group. Both groups were followed-up until the end of 2010 to measure the incidence of NTM disease and active PTB. We analyzed the risk of NTM disease and active PTB using the Cox proportional hazards regression models, controlling for sex, age, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI).

Results: The incidence of NTM disease was 4.22 times greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group (1.91 vs 0.45 per 10,000 person-years). The incidence of PTB was 2.99 times greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group (25.3 vs 8.46 per 10,000 person-years). After adjusting for age, sex, and CCI, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of NTM disease and active PTB for the RA group were 4.17 (95% CI = 2.61-6.65) and 2.87 (95% CI = 2.55-3.23), respectively, compared with the non-RA group. In the first 2 years of follow-up, the RA group yielded corresponding adjusted HRs of 4.98 and 3.39 compared with the non-RA group. The follow-up time-specific RA group to the non-RA group HR of both the NTM disease and active PTB varied.

Conclusion: This study can serve as a reference for clinical physicians to increase awareness regarding the detection of NTM disease and active PTB in RA patients among the any stage of the clinical course even without CCI.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative incidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (dashed line) and comparison subjects (solid line).
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pone-0110922-g002: Cumulative incidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (dashed line) and comparison subjects (solid line).

Mentions: With 13 years of follow-up, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the cumulative incidence of NTM disease was 0.175% higher in the RA group than in the non-RA group. The incident number declined steadily in the RA group. The cumulative incidence of active PTB was 2.0% greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group. However, the event number declined faster in the RA group than in the non-RA group (Figures 1 and 2).


Rheumatoid arthritis increases the risk of nontuberculosis mycobacterial disease and active pulmonary tuberculosis.

Yeh JJ, Wang YC, Sung FC, Kao CH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Cumulative incidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (dashed line) and comparison subjects (solid line).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206451&req=5

pone-0110922-g002: Cumulative incidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (dashed line) and comparison subjects (solid line).
Mentions: With 13 years of follow-up, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the cumulative incidence of NTM disease was 0.175% higher in the RA group than in the non-RA group. The incident number declined steadily in the RA group. The cumulative incidence of active PTB was 2.0% greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group. However, the event number declined faster in the RA group than in the non-RA group (Figures 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: After adjusting for age, sex, and CCI, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of NTM disease and active PTB for the RA group were 4.17 (95% CI = 2.61-6.65) and 2.87 (95% CI = 2.55-3.23), respectively, compared with the non-RA group.In the first 2 years of follow-up, the RA group yielded corresponding adjusted HRs of 4.98 and 3.39 compared with the non-RA group.This study can serve as a reference for clinical physicians to increase awareness regarding the detection of NTM disease and active PTB in RA patients among the any stage of the clinical course even without CCI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine and Family Medicine, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan; Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have examined the association of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with nontuberculosis mycobacterium (NTM) disease and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB).

Methods: We identified 29 131 patients with RA from the catastrophic illness registry who were diagnosed from 1998-2008; 116 524 patients without RA from inpatient data files were randomly frequency matched according to sex, age, and index year and used as a comparison group. Both groups were followed-up until the end of 2010 to measure the incidence of NTM disease and active PTB. We analyzed the risk of NTM disease and active PTB using the Cox proportional hazards regression models, controlling for sex, age, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI).

Results: The incidence of NTM disease was 4.22 times greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group (1.91 vs 0.45 per 10,000 person-years). The incidence of PTB was 2.99 times greater in the RA group than in the non-RA group (25.3 vs 8.46 per 10,000 person-years). After adjusting for age, sex, and CCI, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of NTM disease and active PTB for the RA group were 4.17 (95% CI = 2.61-6.65) and 2.87 (95% CI = 2.55-3.23), respectively, compared with the non-RA group. In the first 2 years of follow-up, the RA group yielded corresponding adjusted HRs of 4.98 and 3.39 compared with the non-RA group. The follow-up time-specific RA group to the non-RA group HR of both the NTM disease and active PTB varied.

Conclusion: This study can serve as a reference for clinical physicians to increase awareness regarding the detection of NTM disease and active PTB in RA patients among the any stage of the clinical course even without CCI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus