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The neuropsychology of starvation: set-shifting and central coherence in a fasted nonclinical sample.

Pender S, Gilbert SJ, Serpell L - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Fasting exacerbated set-shifting difficulties on a rule-change task.Fasting was associated with stronger local and impaired global processing, indicating weaker central coherence.Models of AN that propose a central role for set-shifting difficulties or weak central coherence should also consider the impact of short-term fasting on these processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Recent research suggests certain neuropsychological deficits occur in anorexia nervosa (AN). The role of starvation in these deficits remains unclear. Studies of individuals without AN can elucidate our understanding of the effect of short-term starvation on neuropsychological performance.

Methods: Using a within-subjects repeated measures design, 60 healthy female participants were tested once after fasting for 18 hours, and once when satiated. Measures included two tasks to measure central coherence and a set-shifting task.

Results: Fasting exacerbated set-shifting difficulties on a rule-change task. Fasting was associated with stronger local and impaired global processing, indicating weaker central coherence.

Conclusions: Models of AN that propose a central role for set-shifting difficulties or weak central coherence should also consider the impact of short-term fasting on these processes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion correct in each condition of the local-global task, separately for the fasting and non-fasting conditions.Results are separated into the first and second letter in each condition, e.g. GL1 would be the initial global letter and GL2 the subsequent local letter in a GL trial. Note that the GL1, GL2, LG1, and LG2 bars all show that performance is superior for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the non-fasting condition.
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pone-0110743-g002: Proportion correct in each condition of the local-global task, separately for the fasting and non-fasting conditions.Results are separated into the first and second letter in each condition, e.g. GL1 would be the initial global letter and GL2 the subsequent local letter in a GL trial. Note that the GL1, GL2, LG1, and LG2 bars all show that performance is superior for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the non-fasting condition.

Mentions: A 2×4×2 (Condition [fasting, satiated] x Trial-type [global-global, local-local, global-local, local-global] x Letter position [first, second]) ANOVA examined the effect of fasting, trial-type, and letter position on performance. Fasting did not affect overall proportion of correct responses, F(1, 56)<0.1, p = .94. There was a highly significant effect of Trial-type, F(3, 54) = 108, p<.001. Performance was markedly more accurate in global-global and local-local conditions than in the global-local or local-global conditions (see Figure 2). There was a significant Condition x Trial-type x Letter position interaction, F(3, 54) = 3.9, p = .014, indicating that fasting affected performance in a way that differed across trial-type and letter position. In the global-local and local-global conditions, which required a switch between global and local configurations, accuracy was higher for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the satiated condition.


The neuropsychology of starvation: set-shifting and central coherence in a fasted nonclinical sample.

Pender S, Gilbert SJ, Serpell L - PLoS ONE (2014)

Proportion correct in each condition of the local-global task, separately for the fasting and non-fasting conditions.Results are separated into the first and second letter in each condition, e.g. GL1 would be the initial global letter and GL2 the subsequent local letter in a GL trial. Note that the GL1, GL2, LG1, and LG2 bars all show that performance is superior for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the non-fasting condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206438&req=5

pone-0110743-g002: Proportion correct in each condition of the local-global task, separately for the fasting and non-fasting conditions.Results are separated into the first and second letter in each condition, e.g. GL1 would be the initial global letter and GL2 the subsequent local letter in a GL trial. Note that the GL1, GL2, LG1, and LG2 bars all show that performance is superior for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the non-fasting condition.
Mentions: A 2×4×2 (Condition [fasting, satiated] x Trial-type [global-global, local-local, global-local, local-global] x Letter position [first, second]) ANOVA examined the effect of fasting, trial-type, and letter position on performance. Fasting did not affect overall proportion of correct responses, F(1, 56)<0.1, p = .94. There was a highly significant effect of Trial-type, F(3, 54) = 108, p<.001. Performance was markedly more accurate in global-global and local-local conditions than in the global-local or local-global conditions (see Figure 2). There was a significant Condition x Trial-type x Letter position interaction, F(3, 54) = 3.9, p = .014, indicating that fasting affected performance in a way that differed across trial-type and letter position. In the global-local and local-global conditions, which required a switch between global and local configurations, accuracy was higher for local letters in the fasting condition and global letters in the satiated condition.

Bottom Line: Fasting exacerbated set-shifting difficulties on a rule-change task.Fasting was associated with stronger local and impaired global processing, indicating weaker central coherence.Models of AN that propose a central role for set-shifting difficulties or weak central coherence should also consider the impact of short-term fasting on these processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Recent research suggests certain neuropsychological deficits occur in anorexia nervosa (AN). The role of starvation in these deficits remains unclear. Studies of individuals without AN can elucidate our understanding of the effect of short-term starvation on neuropsychological performance.

Methods: Using a within-subjects repeated measures design, 60 healthy female participants were tested once after fasting for 18 hours, and once when satiated. Measures included two tasks to measure central coherence and a set-shifting task.

Results: Fasting exacerbated set-shifting difficulties on a rule-change task. Fasting was associated with stronger local and impaired global processing, indicating weaker central coherence.

Conclusions: Models of AN that propose a central role for set-shifting difficulties or weak central coherence should also consider the impact of short-term fasting on these processes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus