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Manufacturing of robust natural fiber preforms utilizing bacterial cellulose as binder.

Lee KY, Shamsuddin SR, Fortea-Verdejo M, Bismarck A - J Vis Exp (2014)

Bottom Line: The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension.The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms.Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, University of Vienna; Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London; koonyang.lee@ucl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion.

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Manufacturing of robust natural fiber preforms utilizing bacterial cellulose as binder.

Lee KY, Shamsuddin SR, Fortea-Verdejo M, Bismarck A - J Vis Exp (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206245&req=5

Bottom Line: The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension.The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms.Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, University of Vienna; Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London; koonyang.lee@ucl.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus