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Identification, rearing, and distribution of stick insects of Madeira Island: an example of raising biodiversity awareness.

Aguiar AM, Pombo DA, Gonçalves YM - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Egg and adult stages are briefly described along with some notes on the life history of these species in captivity.Data on islandwide distribution are based on specimens donated by the public in response to an article published in a daily newspaper.The role of newspapers as a means of communicating awareness in biodiversity issues is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Secretaria Regional do Ambiente e Recursos Naturais, Laboratório de Qualidade Agrícola, Caminho Municipal dos Caboucos, 61, 9135-372, Camacha, Madeira, Portugal antonioaguiar.sra@gov-madeira.pt.

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Number of days (y axis) in which were collected, from 0 to 11 eggs per day (x axis) for Carausius morosus and Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f07_01: Number of days (y axis) in which were collected, from 0 to 11 eggs per day (x axis) for Carausius morosus and Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: Oviposition: An adult female kept in laboratory from 28.vi.2010 to 26.xi.2010 laid 339 eggs. The comparatively large oviposition rate was similar to that observed by other authors (Roth 1916). The number of eggs laid per day during the oviposition period observed over 25 days varied greatly between 0 and 10 (the mean number of eggs per day was 3.76). This was considerably larger than the mean number of eggs calculated for the whole oviposition period (2.26 eggs per day) (Figure 7). The number of eggs laid decreased considerably after the 11th week with less than one egg produced per day. The post-ovipositional period lasted eight weeks (Figure 6). According to Lelong (1995), C. morosus only reproduces sexually in its Asian country of origin; in Europe, populations are made up exclusively of females. The males are reported to be very rare, and we were unable to observe any in the field or in the laboratory population.


Identification, rearing, and distribution of stick insects of Madeira Island: an example of raising biodiversity awareness.

Aguiar AM, Pombo DA, Gonçalves YM - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Number of days (y axis) in which were collected, from 0 to 11 eggs per day (x axis) for Carausius morosus and Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206241&req=5

f07_01: Number of days (y axis) in which were collected, from 0 to 11 eggs per day (x axis) for Carausius morosus and Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: Oviposition: An adult female kept in laboratory from 28.vi.2010 to 26.xi.2010 laid 339 eggs. The comparatively large oviposition rate was similar to that observed by other authors (Roth 1916). The number of eggs laid per day during the oviposition period observed over 25 days varied greatly between 0 and 10 (the mean number of eggs per day was 3.76). This was considerably larger than the mean number of eggs calculated for the whole oviposition period (2.26 eggs per day) (Figure 7). The number of eggs laid decreased considerably after the 11th week with less than one egg produced per day. The post-ovipositional period lasted eight weeks (Figure 6). According to Lelong (1995), C. morosus only reproduces sexually in its Asian country of origin; in Europe, populations are made up exclusively of females. The males are reported to be very rare, and we were unable to observe any in the field or in the laboratory population.

Bottom Line: Egg and adult stages are briefly described along with some notes on the life history of these species in captivity.Data on islandwide distribution are based on specimens donated by the public in response to an article published in a daily newspaper.The role of newspapers as a means of communicating awareness in biodiversity issues is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Secretaria Regional do Ambiente e Recursos Naturais, Laboratório de Qualidade Agrícola, Caminho Municipal dos Caboucos, 61, 9135-372, Camacha, Madeira, Portugal antonioaguiar.sra@gov-madeira.pt.

Show MeSH