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Identification, rearing, and distribution of stick insects of Madeira Island: an example of raising biodiversity awareness.

Aguiar AM, Pombo DA, Gonçalves YM - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Egg and adult stages are briefly described along with some notes on the life history of these species in captivity.Data on islandwide distribution are based on specimens donated by the public in response to an article published in a daily newspaper.The role of newspapers as a means of communicating awareness in biodiversity issues is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Secretaria Regional do Ambiente e Recursos Naturais, Laboratório de Qualidade Agrícola, Caminho Municipal dos Caboucos, 61, 9135-372, Camacha, Madeira, Portugal antonioaguiar.sra@gov-madeira.pt.

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General habitus in dorsal view: a — female Carausius morosus, b — female Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f01_01: General habitus in dorsal view: a — female Carausius morosus, b — female Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: The two species of stick insect, Clonopsis gallica and Carausius morosus, presently breeding in the wild on Madeira Island can be easily differentiated macroscopically. These stick insects are parthenogenetic, and so, as males are extremely rare in nature, we will be referring exclusively to female characters (see Table 1). The most common species, C. morosus, has a slightly longer body (Figure 1a) and long antennae (Figure 1a, 2a), almost filiform with numerous small segments; the inner face of the fore femur's base is bright red (Figure 2a); the subgenital plate reaches the apex of tergite 10 (Figure 3a); the eggs are globose, brown, and the operculum located at the anterior pole has a button-like yellowish capitulum (Figure 4a,b,c) and a brownish micropylar plate occupying about half length of the egg's dorsal surface. The second species, C. gallica, has short antennae with 13 segments (Figure 1b, 2b); inner face of fore femur's base the same color as body (Figure 2b); subgenital plate reaches the apex of tergite 9 (Figure 3b), and the egg of similar shape but the operculum does not present a capitulum and the micropylar plate has the same colour of the main capsule, occupying about 0.66 of the egg's length (Figure 4d, e, f).


Identification, rearing, and distribution of stick insects of Madeira Island: an example of raising biodiversity awareness.

Aguiar AM, Pombo DA, Gonçalves YM - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

General habitus in dorsal view: a — female Carausius morosus, b — female Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206241&req=5

f01_01: General habitus in dorsal view: a — female Carausius morosus, b — female Clonopsis gallica. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: The two species of stick insect, Clonopsis gallica and Carausius morosus, presently breeding in the wild on Madeira Island can be easily differentiated macroscopically. These stick insects are parthenogenetic, and so, as males are extremely rare in nature, we will be referring exclusively to female characters (see Table 1). The most common species, C. morosus, has a slightly longer body (Figure 1a) and long antennae (Figure 1a, 2a), almost filiform with numerous small segments; the inner face of the fore femur's base is bright red (Figure 2a); the subgenital plate reaches the apex of tergite 10 (Figure 3a); the eggs are globose, brown, and the operculum located at the anterior pole has a button-like yellowish capitulum (Figure 4a,b,c) and a brownish micropylar plate occupying about half length of the egg's dorsal surface. The second species, C. gallica, has short antennae with 13 segments (Figure 1b, 2b); inner face of fore femur's base the same color as body (Figure 2b); subgenital plate reaches the apex of tergite 9 (Figure 3b), and the egg of similar shape but the operculum does not present a capitulum and the micropylar plate has the same colour of the main capsule, occupying about 0.66 of the egg's length (Figure 4d, e, f).

Bottom Line: Egg and adult stages are briefly described along with some notes on the life history of these species in captivity.Data on islandwide distribution are based on specimens donated by the public in response to an article published in a daily newspaper.The role of newspapers as a means of communicating awareness in biodiversity issues is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Secretaria Regional do Ambiente e Recursos Naturais, Laboratório de Qualidade Agrícola, Caminho Municipal dos Caboucos, 61, 9135-372, Camacha, Madeira, Portugal antonioaguiar.sra@gov-madeira.pt.

Show MeSH