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Biology of the coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi, on French beans.

Egonyu JP, Ekesi S, Kabaru J, Irungu L - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Development and survival of immatures on French beans was comparable to what is reported with two hosts previously used for rearing this species, namely coconut and cashew.Adults survived thrice longer and laid almost twice more eggs on the French beans than was reported for the two hosts above.These findings suggest that French beans are more suitable for mass rearing of this species than coconut and cashew, which have been used previously but can be scarce and too costly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology-African Insect Science for Food and Health, P.O. Box 30772, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya School of Biological Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya egjp29@yahoo.co.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A pictorial summary of laboratory mass rearing of Pseudotheraptus wayi on French bean pods. A: an adult rearing cotton drill cage; B: an egg incubation glass vial; C: a plastic bottle for rearing nymphs for the first 3–4 days; D: a plastic basket for rearing nymphs until adult emergence. High quality figures are available online.
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f01_01: A pictorial summary of laboratory mass rearing of Pseudotheraptus wayi on French bean pods. A: an adult rearing cotton drill cage; B: an egg incubation glass vial; C: a plastic bottle for rearing nymphs for the first 3–4 days; D: a plastic basket for rearing nymphs until adult emergence. High quality figures are available online.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows images of the cages used in rearing the insects. Adults were reared in wooden-cotton drill cages (61 × 46 × 46 cm), and the eggs were incubated in glass vials (2.5 cm inner diameter × 7.5 cm high) according to Wheatley (1961). An attempt to rear nymphs in the wooden-cotton drill cage (23 × 30 × 30 cm) designed by Wheatley (1961) was unsuccessful because most of the newly hatched first instars were unable to timely detect the food and initiate feeding, probably due to excessive space in the cage, and starved to death. These cages were also inessential for the nymphs, unlike adults, which preferred to lay eggs on the cotton, therefore a relatively cheaper cage could suffice. To avoid these challenges, all first instars were transferred from the glass vials into small cylindrical plastic bottles (3.5 cm inner diameter × 6 cm high) using a camel-hair brush within 0–12 hr of hatching. The emerging nymphs had less space to wander around and were maintained in these bottles for 3–4 days. At this age, most nymphs had acclimatized to the food substrate and could search for it even in relatively more spacious cages. They were therefore transferred to a ventilated plastic basket (24 cm inner diameter × 16 cm high) lined at the bottom with filter paper (24 cm diameter) that was replaced weekly. The nymphs were maintained in these plastic baskets until the emergence of adults, which were transferred into the cotton drill cages described above.


Biology of the coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi, on French beans.

Egonyu JP, Ekesi S, Kabaru J, Irungu L - J. Insect Sci. (2014)

A pictorial summary of laboratory mass rearing of Pseudotheraptus wayi on French bean pods. A: an adult rearing cotton drill cage; B: an egg incubation glass vial; C: a plastic bottle for rearing nymphs for the first 3–4 days; D: a plastic basket for rearing nymphs until adult emergence. High quality figures are available online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206236&req=5

f01_01: A pictorial summary of laboratory mass rearing of Pseudotheraptus wayi on French bean pods. A: an adult rearing cotton drill cage; B: an egg incubation glass vial; C: a plastic bottle for rearing nymphs for the first 3–4 days; D: a plastic basket for rearing nymphs until adult emergence. High quality figures are available online.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows images of the cages used in rearing the insects. Adults were reared in wooden-cotton drill cages (61 × 46 × 46 cm), and the eggs were incubated in glass vials (2.5 cm inner diameter × 7.5 cm high) according to Wheatley (1961). An attempt to rear nymphs in the wooden-cotton drill cage (23 × 30 × 30 cm) designed by Wheatley (1961) was unsuccessful because most of the newly hatched first instars were unable to timely detect the food and initiate feeding, probably due to excessive space in the cage, and starved to death. These cages were also inessential for the nymphs, unlike adults, which preferred to lay eggs on the cotton, therefore a relatively cheaper cage could suffice. To avoid these challenges, all first instars were transferred from the glass vials into small cylindrical plastic bottles (3.5 cm inner diameter × 6 cm high) using a camel-hair brush within 0–12 hr of hatching. The emerging nymphs had less space to wander around and were maintained in these bottles for 3–4 days. At this age, most nymphs had acclimatized to the food substrate and could search for it even in relatively more spacious cages. They were therefore transferred to a ventilated plastic basket (24 cm inner diameter × 16 cm high) lined at the bottom with filter paper (24 cm diameter) that was replaced weekly. The nymphs were maintained in these plastic baskets until the emergence of adults, which were transferred into the cotton drill cages described above.

Bottom Line: Development and survival of immatures on French beans was comparable to what is reported with two hosts previously used for rearing this species, namely coconut and cashew.Adults survived thrice longer and laid almost twice more eggs on the French beans than was reported for the two hosts above.These findings suggest that French beans are more suitable for mass rearing of this species than coconut and cashew, which have been used previously but can be scarce and too costly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology-African Insect Science for Food and Health, P.O. Box 30772, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya School of Biological Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya egjp29@yahoo.co.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus