Limits...
[Consumer reaction to information on the labels of genetically modified food].

Sebastian-Ponce MI, Sanz-Valero J, Wanden-Berghe C - Rev Saude Publica (2014)

Bottom Line: Price was an influencing factor in all cases.Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information.Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modified products and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes new technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze consumer opinion on genetically modified foods and the information included on the label.

Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature on genetically modified food labeling was conducted consulting bibliographic databases (Medline - via PubMed -, EMBASE, ISI-Web of knowledge, Cochrane Library Plus, FSTA, LILACS, CINAHL and AGRICOLA) using the descriptors "organisms, genetically modified" and "food labeling". The search covered the first available date, up to June 2012, selecting relevant articles written in English, Portuguese or Spanish.

Results: Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All of them should have conducted a population-based intervention focused on consumer awareness of genetically modified foods and their need or not, to include this on the label. The consumers expressed a preference for non-genetically modified products, and added that they were prepared to pay more for this but, ultimately, the product bought was that with the best price, in a market which welcomes new technologies. In 18 of the articles, the population was in favor of obligatory labelling, and in six, in favor of this being voluntary; seven studies showed the consumer knew little about genetically modified food, and in three, the population underestimated the quantity they consumed. Price was an influencing factor in all cases.

Conclusions: Label should be homogeneous and clarify the degree of tolerance of genetically modified products in humans, in comparison with those non-genetically modified. Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information. Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modified products and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes new technologies.

Show MeSH
Diagram of the selection of articles on GM and labeling.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206125&req=5

f01: Diagram of the selection of articles on GM and labeling.

Mentions: A total of 495 articles were found, of which 372 (75.1%) were from the Institute forScientific Information (ISI) database, 62 from Web Of Knowledge, (12.3%), fromMedline, 31 (6.3%), and 16 from EMBASE (3.2%), from CINAHL, 12 (2.4%), from AGRICOLAand 3 (0.6%) from LILACS. Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusionand exclusion criteria1-6,8-12,15,18,20,21,23-26,28-34,36,40,41,43,46,47,52,53,56,58-61,63 (Figure).


[Consumer reaction to information on the labels of genetically modified food].

Sebastian-Ponce MI, Sanz-Valero J, Wanden-Berghe C - Rev Saude Publica (2014)

Diagram of the selection of articles on GM and labeling.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206125&req=5

f01: Diagram of the selection of articles on GM and labeling.
Mentions: A total of 495 articles were found, of which 372 (75.1%) were from the Institute forScientific Information (ISI) database, 62 from Web Of Knowledge, (12.3%), fromMedline, 31 (6.3%), and 16 from EMBASE (3.2%), from CINAHL, 12 (2.4%), from AGRICOLAand 3 (0.6%) from LILACS. Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusionand exclusion criteria1-6,8-12,15,18,20,21,23-26,28-34,36,40,41,43,46,47,52,53,56,58-61,63 (Figure).

Bottom Line: Price was an influencing factor in all cases.Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information.Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modified products and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes new technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze consumer opinion on genetically modified foods and the information included on the label.

Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature on genetically modified food labeling was conducted consulting bibliographic databases (Medline - via PubMed -, EMBASE, ISI-Web of knowledge, Cochrane Library Plus, FSTA, LILACS, CINAHL and AGRICOLA) using the descriptors "organisms, genetically modified" and "food labeling". The search covered the first available date, up to June 2012, selecting relevant articles written in English, Portuguese or Spanish.

Results: Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All of them should have conducted a population-based intervention focused on consumer awareness of genetically modified foods and their need or not, to include this on the label. The consumers expressed a preference for non-genetically modified products, and added that they were prepared to pay more for this but, ultimately, the product bought was that with the best price, in a market which welcomes new technologies. In 18 of the articles, the population was in favor of obligatory labelling, and in six, in favor of this being voluntary; seven studies showed the consumer knew little about genetically modified food, and in three, the population underestimated the quantity they consumed. Price was an influencing factor in all cases.

Conclusions: Label should be homogeneous and clarify the degree of tolerance of genetically modified products in humans, in comparison with those non-genetically modified. Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information. Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modified products and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes new technologies.

Show MeSH