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Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative and therelationship with exclusive breastfeeding

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and the association withthe Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative.

Methods: Cross-sectional study, whose data source were research on feeding behaviorsin the first year of life conducted in the vaccination campaigns of 2003 and2006, at the municipality of Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil. For thepurposes of this study, infants under six months old, accounting for a totalof 589 children in 2003 and 707 children in 2006, were selected. To verifythe relationship between being followed-up by Breastfeeding-Friendly PrimaryCare Unit Initiative units and exclusive breastfeeding practice, only datafrom the 2006 inquiry was used. Variables that in the bivariate analysiswere associated (p-value ≤ 0.20) with the outcome (exclusive breastfeedingpractice) were selected for multivariate analysis. Prevalence ratios (PR) ofexclusive breastfeeding were obtained by Poisson Regression with robustvariance through a hierarchical model. The final model included thevariables that reached p-value ≤ 0.05.

Results: The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding increased from 30.2% in 2003 to46.7% in 2006. Multivariate analysis showed that mother's low educationlevel reduced exclusive breastfeeding practice by 20.0% (PR = 0.798; 95%CI0.684;0.931), cesarean delivery by 16.0% (PR = 0.838; 95%CI 0.719;0.976),and pacifier use by 41.0% (PR = 0.589; 95%CI 0.495;0.701). In the multipleanalysis, each day of the infant's life reduced exclusive breastfeedingprevalence by 1.0% (PR = 0.992; 95%CI 0.991;0.994). Being followed-up byBreastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Initiative units increased exclusivebreastfeeding by 19.0% (PR = 1.193; 95%CI 1.020;1.395).

Conclusions: Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative contributed to thepractice of exclusive breastfeeding and to the advice for pregnant women andnursing mothers when implemented in the primary health care network.

No MeSH data available.


Characteristics of the mother, birth, baby and health care unit affectingexclusive breastfeeding. Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, 2006.
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f01: Characteristics of the mother, birth, baby and health care unit affectingexclusive breastfeeding. Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, 2006.

Mentions: The adjusted prevalence ratios were obtained using a Poisson regression model withrobust variance, as the outcome was highly prevalent. 7 The final model, used to estimate measures ofassociation with the respective 95% confidence intervals, was composed of exposurevariables with p ≤ 0.05 and the child's age as a continuous variable. The regressionfollowed a hierarchical model, 26considering the characteristics of the mother as distal, the characteristics of thebirth as intermediary, and the characteristics of the baby and the health care unitas proximal (Figure 1).


Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative and therelationship with exclusive breastfeeding
Characteristics of the mother, birth, baby and health care unit affectingexclusive breastfeeding. Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, 2006.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4206101&req=5

f01: Characteristics of the mother, birth, baby and health care unit affectingexclusive breastfeeding. Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, 2006.
Mentions: The adjusted prevalence ratios were obtained using a Poisson regression model withrobust variance, as the outcome was highly prevalent. 7 The final model, used to estimate measures ofassociation with the respective 95% confidence intervals, was composed of exposurevariables with p ≤ 0.05 and the child's age as a continuous variable. The regressionfollowed a hierarchical model, 26considering the characteristics of the mother as distal, the characteristics of thebirth as intermediary, and the characteristics of the baby and the health care unitas proximal (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and the association withthe Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative.

Methods: Cross-sectional study, whose data source were research on feeding behaviorsin the first year of life conducted in the vaccination campaigns of 2003 and2006, at the municipality of Barra Mansa, RJ, Southeastern Brazil. For thepurposes of this study, infants under six months old, accounting for a totalof 589 children in 2003 and 707 children in 2006, were selected. To verifythe relationship between being followed-up by Breastfeeding-Friendly PrimaryCare Unit Initiative units and exclusive breastfeeding practice, only datafrom the 2006 inquiry was used. Variables that in the bivariate analysiswere associated (p-value ≤ 0.20) with the outcome (exclusive breastfeedingpractice) were selected for multivariate analysis. Prevalence ratios (PR) ofexclusive breastfeeding were obtained by Poisson Regression with robustvariance through a hierarchical model. The final model included thevariables that reached p-value ≤ 0.05.

Results: The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding increased from 30.2% in 2003 to46.7% in 2006. Multivariate analysis showed that mother's low educationlevel reduced exclusive breastfeeding practice by 20.0% (PR = 0.798; 95%CI0.684;0.931), cesarean delivery by 16.0% (PR = 0.838; 95%CI 0.719;0.976),and pacifier use by 41.0% (PR = 0.589; 95%CI 0.495;0.701). In the multipleanalysis, each day of the infant's life reduced exclusive breastfeedingprevalence by 1.0% (PR = 0.992; 95%CI 0.991;0.994). Being followed-up byBreastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Initiative units increased exclusivebreastfeeding by 19.0% (PR = 1.193; 95%CI 1.020;1.395).

Conclusions: Breastfeeding-Friendly Primary Care Unit Initiative contributed to thepractice of exclusive breastfeeding and to the advice for pregnant women andnursing mothers when implemented in the primary health care network.

No MeSH data available.