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Modulation of interhemispheric functional coordination in electroconvulsive therapy for depression.

Wei Q, Tian Y, Yu Y, Zhang F, Hu X, Dong Y, Chen Y, Hu P, Hu X, Wang K - Transl Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: For depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective therapy, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown.The results showed that, compared with depression patients before ECT, VMHC was significantly increased in superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients after ECT.Compared with healthy controls, VMHC in those areas was significantly lower in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients before ECT, but no significant difference was observed in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) and middle frontal gyri (BA 10).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.

ABSTRACT
Considerable evidence suggests that depression is related to interhemispheric functional coordination deficits. For depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective therapy, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of ECT on the interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to observe the change of interhemispheric functional coordination with the method of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) in 11 depressed patients before and after ECT, compared with 15 healthy controls. The results showed that, compared with depression patients before ECT, VMHC was significantly increased in superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients after ECT. Compared with healthy controls, VMHC in those areas was significantly lower in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients before ECT, but no significant difference was observed in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) and middle frontal gyri (BA 10). There was no significant correlation between the changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and changed VMHC values in those four areas in depression patients. The results suggest that ECT selectively modulated interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. Such may play an important mechanistic role in the treatment of depression, and may afford a useful avenue for optimizing treatment.

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The correlation between changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores and changes of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). (a) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783). (b) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978). (c) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282). (d) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638).
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fig3: The correlation between changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores and changes of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). (a) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783). (b) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978). (c) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282). (d) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638).

Mentions: We calculated changed VMHC values (VMHC after ECT minus VMHC before ECT) in the four significant clusters (superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39)). Similarly, post-ECT scores minus pre-ECT scores indicated HAMD changes. No significant correlation was observed between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783), middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978), middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282) or in the angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638). The results were shown in Figure 3.


Modulation of interhemispheric functional coordination in electroconvulsive therapy for depression.

Wei Q, Tian Y, Yu Y, Zhang F, Hu X, Dong Y, Chen Y, Hu P, Hu X, Wang K - Transl Psychiatry (2014)

The correlation between changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores and changes of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). (a) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783). (b) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978). (c) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282). (d) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202999&req=5

fig3: The correlation between changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) scores and changes of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). (a) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783). (b) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978). (c) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282). (d) There was no significant correlation between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638).
Mentions: We calculated changed VMHC values (VMHC after ECT minus VMHC before ECT) in the four significant clusters (superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39)). Similarly, post-ECT scores minus pre-ECT scores indicated HAMD changes. No significant correlation was observed between the changes of HAMD scores and the changed VMHC values in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) (r=−0.094; P=0.783), middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) (r=0.009; P=0.978), middle frontal gyri (BA 10) (r=−0.356; P=0.282) or in the angular gyri (BA 39) (r=−0.160; P=0.638). The results were shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: For depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective therapy, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown.The results showed that, compared with depression patients before ECT, VMHC was significantly increased in superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients after ECT.Compared with healthy controls, VMHC in those areas was significantly lower in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients before ECT, but no significant difference was observed in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) and middle frontal gyri (BA 10).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.

ABSTRACT
Considerable evidence suggests that depression is related to interhemispheric functional coordination deficits. For depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective therapy, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of ECT on the interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to observe the change of interhemispheric functional coordination with the method of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) in 11 depressed patients before and after ECT, compared with 15 healthy controls. The results showed that, compared with depression patients before ECT, VMHC was significantly increased in superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients after ECT. Compared with healthy controls, VMHC in those areas was significantly lower in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients before ECT, but no significant difference was observed in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) and middle frontal gyri (BA 10). There was no significant correlation between the changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and changed VMHC values in those four areas in depression patients. The results suggest that ECT selectively modulated interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. Such may play an important mechanistic role in the treatment of depression, and may afford a useful avenue for optimizing treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus