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'Your health our concern, our health whose concern?': perceptions of injustice in organizational relationships and processes and frontline health worker motivation in Ghana.

Aberese-Ako M, van Dijk H, Gerrits T, Arhinful DK, Agyepong IA - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Bottom Line: Taking a perspective of frontline health workers as internal clients within health systems, this study explored how perceived injustice in policy and organizational matters influence frontline health worker motivation and the consequent effect on workers' attitudes and performance in delivering maternal and neonatal health care in public hospitals.Meeting these quality needs of internal clients and creating a sense of fairness in governance arrangements between frontline workers, facilities and health system managers is crucial.Consequently, intervention measures such as creating more open door policies, involving frontline workers in decision making, recognizing their needs and challenges and working together to address them are critical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon matilda.aberese-ako@wur.nl maberese@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Processes in health workermotivation.
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czu068-F1: Processes in health workermotivation.

Mentions: Thus, health workers who are the custodians of health care of the general publicperceive that they do not receive ‘people-centred’ care. Thisinteraction fits Ntim’s assertion in his article on economic governance andsocial accountability in Ghana: ‘The moment there is a perception ofunfairness—that others are having more than their due, this de factoprecipitates agitation’ (Ntim 2013). This goes to support other findings in thisstudy that suggest that majority of frontline health workers perceive distributive,procedural and interactional injustice to be operating at local hospital managementand the wider health sector decision-making levels. By the wider health sectordecision-making level, we are referring to the Ministry of Health as well as itsnational directorate; the GHS and the regional-level directorates, which have theresponsibility for making decisions that become authoritative for the lower levels(districts, hospitals and below). In the rest of this section the findings willpresent narratives of frontline workers based on Figure 1 as follows: distributive, procedural andinteractional injustice at hospital management and the wider health sectordecision-making levels. Factors influencing intrinsic motivation of frontlineworkers and consequences on workers’ response to clients’ needs willalso be discussed. Figure1


'Your health our concern, our health whose concern?': perceptions of injustice in organizational relationships and processes and frontline health worker motivation in Ghana.

Aberese-Ako M, van Dijk H, Gerrits T, Arhinful DK, Agyepong IA - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Processes in health workermotivation.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202923&req=5

czu068-F1: Processes in health workermotivation.
Mentions: Thus, health workers who are the custodians of health care of the general publicperceive that they do not receive ‘people-centred’ care. Thisinteraction fits Ntim’s assertion in his article on economic governance andsocial accountability in Ghana: ‘The moment there is a perception ofunfairness—that others are having more than their due, this de factoprecipitates agitation’ (Ntim 2013). This goes to support other findings in thisstudy that suggest that majority of frontline health workers perceive distributive,procedural and interactional injustice to be operating at local hospital managementand the wider health sector decision-making levels. By the wider health sectordecision-making level, we are referring to the Ministry of Health as well as itsnational directorate; the GHS and the regional-level directorates, which have theresponsibility for making decisions that become authoritative for the lower levels(districts, hospitals and below). In the rest of this section the findings willpresent narratives of frontline workers based on Figure 1 as follows: distributive, procedural andinteractional injustice at hospital management and the wider health sectordecision-making levels. Factors influencing intrinsic motivation of frontlineworkers and consequences on workers’ response to clients’ needs willalso be discussed. Figure1

Bottom Line: Taking a perspective of frontline health workers as internal clients within health systems, this study explored how perceived injustice in policy and organizational matters influence frontline health worker motivation and the consequent effect on workers' attitudes and performance in delivering maternal and neonatal health care in public hospitals.Meeting these quality needs of internal clients and creating a sense of fairness in governance arrangements between frontline workers, facilities and health system managers is crucial.Consequently, intervention measures such as creating more open door policies, involving frontline workers in decision making, recognizing their needs and challenges and working together to address them are critical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon Ghana Health Service, Navrongo Health Research Centre, P.O. Box 433, Bolgatanga, UER, Ghana, Sociology and Anthropology of Development Group, P.O. Box 8130, 6700 EW, Hollandseweg 1, Wageningen, The Netherlands, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Kloveniersburgwal 48 1012 CX Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, NMIMR, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 581 Legon and School of Public Health, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13 Legon matilda.aberese-ako@wur.nl maberese@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.