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Evaluating the implementation of community volunteer assessment and referral of sick babies: lessons learned from the Ghana Newhints home visits cluster randomized controlled trial.

Ansah Manu A, ten Asbroek A, Soremekun S, Gyan T, Weobong B, Tawiah-Agyemang C, Danso S, Amenga-Etego S, Owusu-Agyei S, Hill Z, Kirkwood BR - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Bottom Line: In Newhints, volunteers (CBSVs) were trusted by families, their visits were acceptable and they engaged mothers/families in decisions, resulting in unprecedented 86% referral compliance and increased (55-77%) care seeking for sick newborns.Poor facility care quality, characterized by poor health worker attitudes, limited the mortality reduction.The important implication for future implementation of home visits in similar settings is that, with 100% specificity but 80% sensitivity of referral decisions, volunteers might miss some danger signs but if successful implementation must translate into mortality reductions, concurrent improvement in facility newborn care quality is imperative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P.O. Box 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK and Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P.O. Box 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK and Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK alex.manu@kintampo-hrc.org.

No MeSH data available.


Conceptual framework for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community volunteer assessment and referral.
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czu080-F2: Conceptual framework for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community volunteer assessment and referral.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the conceptual framework adopted by the Newhints intervention for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community assessment and referral as a strategy to improve survival. There are three main steps, each with a specific goal. These are (1) sick newborns are identified in the community and referred (2) families comply with referrals and (3) referred babies receive appropriate management at health facilities. The framework shows the rationale for each step, the strategy used to achieve the goal (outlined below) and the key requirements for success. The rationale and the evaluation of the key requirement for success are discussed in detail in the section on findings, drawing together data from the formative research and the process evaluation.Figure 2.


Evaluating the implementation of community volunteer assessment and referral of sick babies: lessons learned from the Ghana Newhints home visits cluster randomized controlled trial.

Ansah Manu A, ten Asbroek A, Soremekun S, Gyan T, Weobong B, Tawiah-Agyemang C, Danso S, Amenga-Etego S, Owusu-Agyei S, Hill Z, Kirkwood BR - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Conceptual framework for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community volunteer assessment and referral.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202912&req=5

czu080-F2: Conceptual framework for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community volunteer assessment and referral.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the conceptual framework adopted by the Newhints intervention for increasing access to care for sick newborns through community assessment and referral as a strategy to improve survival. There are three main steps, each with a specific goal. These are (1) sick newborns are identified in the community and referred (2) families comply with referrals and (3) referred babies receive appropriate management at health facilities. The framework shows the rationale for each step, the strategy used to achieve the goal (outlined below) and the key requirements for success. The rationale and the evaluation of the key requirement for success are discussed in detail in the section on findings, drawing together data from the formative research and the process evaluation.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In Newhints, volunteers (CBSVs) were trusted by families, their visits were acceptable and they engaged mothers/families in decisions, resulting in unprecedented 86% referral compliance and increased (55-77%) care seeking for sick newborns.Poor facility care quality, characterized by poor health worker attitudes, limited the mortality reduction.The important implication for future implementation of home visits in similar settings is that, with 100% specificity but 80% sensitivity of referral decisions, volunteers might miss some danger signs but if successful implementation must translate into mortality reductions, concurrent improvement in facility newborn care quality is imperative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P.O. Box 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK and Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P.O. Box 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK and Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK alex.manu@kintampo-hrc.org.

No MeSH data available.