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Body weight status, eating behavior, sensitivity to reward/punishment, and gender: relationships and interdependencies.

Dietrich A, Federbusch M, Grellmann C, Villringer A, Horstmann A - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: We found an inverted U-shaped relationship between restrained eating and BMI.Independent of eating behavior, BIS and BAS responsiveness were associated with BMI in a gender-specific manner with negative relationships for men and positive relationships for women.In summary, our results demonstrate a system of linear and non-linear relationships between the investigated factors and BMI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Behavioral and personality characteristics are factors that may jointly regulate body weight. This study explored the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and self-reported behavioral and personality measures. These measures included eating behavior (based on the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire; Stunkard and Messick, 1985), sensitivity to reward and punishment (based on the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales) (Carver and White, 1994) and self-reported impulsivity (based on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11; Patton et al., 1995). We found an inverted U-shaped relationship between restrained eating and BMI. This relationship was moderated by the level of disinhibited eating. Independent of eating behavior, BIS and BAS responsiveness were associated with BMI in a gender-specific manner with negative relationships for men and positive relationships for women. Together, eating behavior and BIS/BAS responsiveness accounted for a substantial proportion of BMI variance (men: ∼25%, women: ∼32%). A direct relationship between self-reported impulsivity and BMI was not observed. In summary, our results demonstrate a system of linear and non-linear relationships between the investigated factors and BMI. Moreover, body weight status was not only associated with eating behavior (cognitive restraint and disinhibition), but also with personality factors not inherently related to an eating context (BIS/BAS). Importantly, these relationships differ between men and women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Quadratic association between BAS and BMI in the TFEQ-plus cohort (n= 192). Partial correlation of BMI2 is -0.92 (p= 0.008, adjusted R2 change of 0.039 through BMI and BMI2, age and gender as covariates). Dashed lines indicate the 95% confidence interval of the quadratic fit line. BAS, Behavioral Activation System total score.
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Figure 5: Quadratic association between BAS and BMI in the TFEQ-plus cohort (n= 192). Partial correlation of BMI2 is -0.92 (p= 0.008, adjusted R2 change of 0.039 through BMI and BMI2, age and gender as covariates). Dashed lines indicate the 95% confidence interval of the quadratic fit line. BAS, Behavioral Activation System total score.

Mentions: As Davis and Fox (2008) reported an inverted U-shaped association between sensitivity to reward and BMI, we tested for the quadratic association of BAS with BMI (hypothesis 6). We corroborated their finding: BMI showed a quadratic relationship with BAS (p= 0.018, age and gender as covariates, adjusted R2 changed by 0.03 after adding BMI and BMI2). There was only a trend for a gender interaction of this effect (p= 0.091, stronger effect in women). Concerning the model, a BMI of around 30 kg/m2 was associated with the highest BAS scores, whereas a higher and lower BMI was associated with lower BAS scores (Figure 5).


Body weight status, eating behavior, sensitivity to reward/punishment, and gender: relationships and interdependencies.

Dietrich A, Federbusch M, Grellmann C, Villringer A, Horstmann A - Front Psychol (2014)

Quadratic association between BAS and BMI in the TFEQ-plus cohort (n= 192). Partial correlation of BMI2 is -0.92 (p= 0.008, adjusted R2 change of 0.039 through BMI and BMI2, age and gender as covariates). Dashed lines indicate the 95% confidence interval of the quadratic fit line. BAS, Behavioral Activation System total score.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202791&req=5

Figure 5: Quadratic association between BAS and BMI in the TFEQ-plus cohort (n= 192). Partial correlation of BMI2 is -0.92 (p= 0.008, adjusted R2 change of 0.039 through BMI and BMI2, age and gender as covariates). Dashed lines indicate the 95% confidence interval of the quadratic fit line. BAS, Behavioral Activation System total score.
Mentions: As Davis and Fox (2008) reported an inverted U-shaped association between sensitivity to reward and BMI, we tested for the quadratic association of BAS with BMI (hypothesis 6). We corroborated their finding: BMI showed a quadratic relationship with BAS (p= 0.018, age and gender as covariates, adjusted R2 changed by 0.03 after adding BMI and BMI2). There was only a trend for a gender interaction of this effect (p= 0.091, stronger effect in women). Concerning the model, a BMI of around 30 kg/m2 was associated with the highest BAS scores, whereas a higher and lower BMI was associated with lower BAS scores (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: We found an inverted U-shaped relationship between restrained eating and BMI.Independent of eating behavior, BIS and BAS responsiveness were associated with BMI in a gender-specific manner with negative relationships for men and positive relationships for women.In summary, our results demonstrate a system of linear and non-linear relationships between the investigated factors and BMI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Behavioral and personality characteristics are factors that may jointly regulate body weight. This study explored the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and self-reported behavioral and personality measures. These measures included eating behavior (based on the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire; Stunkard and Messick, 1985), sensitivity to reward and punishment (based on the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales) (Carver and White, 1994) and self-reported impulsivity (based on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11; Patton et al., 1995). We found an inverted U-shaped relationship between restrained eating and BMI. This relationship was moderated by the level of disinhibited eating. Independent of eating behavior, BIS and BAS responsiveness were associated with BMI in a gender-specific manner with negative relationships for men and positive relationships for women. Together, eating behavior and BIS/BAS responsiveness accounted for a substantial proportion of BMI variance (men: ∼25%, women: ∼32%). A direct relationship between self-reported impulsivity and BMI was not observed. In summary, our results demonstrate a system of linear and non-linear relationships between the investigated factors and BMI. Moreover, body weight status was not only associated with eating behavior (cognitive restraint and disinhibition), but also with personality factors not inherently related to an eating context (BIS/BAS). Importantly, these relationships differ between men and women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus