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Social stress at work and change in women's body weight.

Kottwitz MU, Grebner S, Semmer NK, Tschan F, Elfering A - Ind Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Social stressors at work (such as conflict or animosities) imply disrespect or a lack of appreciation and thus a threat to self.Stress induced by this offence to self might result, over time, in a change in body weight.Fifty-seven women in their first year of occupational life participated at baseline and thirty-eight at follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work and Organisational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Berne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Social stressors at work (such as conflict or animosities) imply disrespect or a lack of appreciation and thus a threat to self. Stress induced by this offence to self might result, over time, in a change in body weight. The current study investigated the impact of changing working conditions--specifically social stressors, demands, and control at work--on women's change in weighted Body-Mass-Index over the course of a year. Fifty-seven women in their first year of occupational life participated at baseline and thirty-eight at follow-up. Working conditions were assessed by self-reports and observer-ratings. Body-Mass-Index at baseline and change in Body-Mass-Index one year later were regressed on self-reported social stressors as well as observed work stressors, observed job control, and their interaction. Seen individually, social stressors at work predicted Body-Mass-Index. Moreover, increase in social stressors and decrease of job control during the first year of occupational life predicted increase in Body-Mass-Index. Work redesign that reduces social stressors at work and increases job control could help to prevent obesity epidemic.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Difference in BMI as a function of social stressors at work.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202752&req=5

fig_001: Difference in BMI as a function of social stressors at work.

Mentions: Longitudinally, an increase in social stressors is associated with an increase in BMI too(Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Social stress at work and change in women's body weight.

Kottwitz MU, Grebner S, Semmer NK, Tschan F, Elfering A - Ind Health (2014)

Difference in BMI as a function of social stressors at work.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202752&req=5

fig_001: Difference in BMI as a function of social stressors at work.
Mentions: Longitudinally, an increase in social stressors is associated with an increase in BMI too(Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Social stressors at work (such as conflict or animosities) imply disrespect or a lack of appreciation and thus a threat to self.Stress induced by this offence to self might result, over time, in a change in body weight.Fifty-seven women in their first year of occupational life participated at baseline and thirty-eight at follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Work and Organisational Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Berne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Social stressors at work (such as conflict or animosities) imply disrespect or a lack of appreciation and thus a threat to self. Stress induced by this offence to self might result, over time, in a change in body weight. The current study investigated the impact of changing working conditions--specifically social stressors, demands, and control at work--on women's change in weighted Body-Mass-Index over the course of a year. Fifty-seven women in their first year of occupational life participated at baseline and thirty-eight at follow-up. Working conditions were assessed by self-reports and observer-ratings. Body-Mass-Index at baseline and change in Body-Mass-Index one year later were regressed on self-reported social stressors as well as observed work stressors, observed job control, and their interaction. Seen individually, social stressors at work predicted Body-Mass-Index. Moreover, increase in social stressors and decrease of job control during the first year of occupational life predicted increase in Body-Mass-Index. Work redesign that reduces social stressors at work and increases job control could help to prevent obesity epidemic.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus