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Long working hours and work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease in Korea.

Chung YK, Kwon YJ - Ind Health (2013)

Bottom Line: The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker's compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases.Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD.Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers' compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker's compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84-0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation.

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The ROC curve of working hours for 4 wk prior the accident on the approval of theclaims for the workers’ compensation about cerebro-cardiovascular disease.
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fig_001: The ROC curve of working hours for 4 wk prior the accident on the approval of theclaims for the workers’ compensation about cerebro-cardiovascular disease.

Mentions: Of all CVD claims judged in 2010, 62 (19.4%) were approved and 257 were denied (Table 1Table 2. The indeces of validity test of working hours before accident on the approval ofwork-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD)Test variablesCutoffAUC95% CISensitivitySpecificityAverage working hours for 4 weeks prior the onset of diseases60.750.880.84–0.930.650.94). The 62 approved claimants were more likelyto work in a factory with 10–49 FTEW (full-time equivalent workers; 53.2%) as compared toworkers in a factory under 50 FTEW with Disapproval (37.7%). This trend showed astatistically significant difference (p<0.002). The most commoncharacteristics among the approved claimants were the following: over age 40 (46.8%); male(90.3%); intracerebral hemorrhage (30.6%); survival case (59.7%); negative for apredisposing disease (54.8%); accident on duty (61.3%); and blue collar (64.5%); however,these were not significant. The ROC for “Working Hours” predicting approval of WR-CVD wascalculated (Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Long working hours and work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease in Korea.

Chung YK, Kwon YJ - Ind Health (2013)

The ROC curve of working hours for 4 wk prior the accident on the approval of theclaims for the workers’ compensation about cerebro-cardiovascular disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202736&req=5

fig_001: The ROC curve of working hours for 4 wk prior the accident on the approval of theclaims for the workers’ compensation about cerebro-cardiovascular disease.
Mentions: Of all CVD claims judged in 2010, 62 (19.4%) were approved and 257 were denied (Table 1Table 2. The indeces of validity test of working hours before accident on the approval ofwork-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD)Test variablesCutoffAUC95% CISensitivitySpecificityAverage working hours for 4 weeks prior the onset of diseases60.750.880.84–0.930.650.94). The 62 approved claimants were more likelyto work in a factory with 10–49 FTEW (full-time equivalent workers; 53.2%) as compared toworkers in a factory under 50 FTEW with Disapproval (37.7%). This trend showed astatistically significant difference (p<0.002). The most commoncharacteristics among the approved claimants were the following: over age 40 (46.8%); male(90.3%); intracerebral hemorrhage (30.6%); survival case (59.7%); negative for apredisposing disease (54.8%); accident on duty (61.3%); and blue collar (64.5%); however,these were not significant. The ROC for “Working Hours” predicting approval of WR-CVD wascalculated (Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker's compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases.Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD.Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers' compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker's compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84-0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation.

Show MeSH