Limits...
Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a small academic hospital experience.

Factor OB, Vu CC, Schneider JG, Witten MR, Schubach SL, Gittleman AE, Catell DT, Haas JA - Front Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: The median age was 78.5 years.Fifty-four percent of the patient population was female.Sixty seven percent of the tumors were stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were stage IB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Radiation Oncology, Winthrop-University Hospital , New York, NY , USA ; Stony Brook School of Medicine , New York, NY , USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose/objective(s): Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to have increased local control and overall survival relative to conventional external beam radiation therapy in patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Excellent rates of local control have been demonstrated both in clinical trials and in single-center studies at large academic institutions. However, there is limited data on the experiences of small academic hospitals with SBRT for stage I NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to report the local control and overall survival rates in patients treated with SBRT for stage I NSCLC at Winthrop-University Hospital (WUH), a small academic hospital.

Materials/methods: This is a retrospective review of 78 stage I central and peripheral NSCLC tumors treated between December 2006 and July 2012 with SBRT at WUH. Treatment was given utilizing fiducials and a respiratory tracking system. If the fiducials were not trackable, a spine tracking system was used for tumor localization. CT-based planning was performed using the ray trace algorithm. Treatment was delivered over consecutive days to a median dose of 4800 cGy delivered in four fractions. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate local control and overall survival.

Results: The median age was 78.5 years. Fifty-four percent of the patient population was female. Sixty seven percent of the tumors were stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were stage IB. Fifty-three percent of the tumors were adenocarcinomas and 29% were squamous cell carcinomas, with the remainder being of unknown histology or NSCLC, not otherwise specified The 2-year local control rate was 87%, and the 2-year overall survival was 68%.

Conclusion: Our findings support that local control and overall survival at a small academic hospital are comparable to that of larger academic institutions' published experiences with SBRT for stage I NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier curve for overall survival. Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202727&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan–Meier curve for overall survival. Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population.

Mentions: The median follow-up for local control was 14.4 months. A total of seven local failures occurred in this study. The median time to local failure was 17 months with a range from 5 to 53 months. The 2-year local control rate was 87% (Figure 1). Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population (Figure 2). There were 16 cases (22%) of mediastinal failure, and 10 cases (14%) of distant metastases. There were 25 cases (34%) of recurrence of any form. The 2-year recurrence-free survival was 48.3% (Figure 3).


Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a small academic hospital experience.

Factor OB, Vu CC, Schneider JG, Witten MR, Schubach SL, Gittleman AE, Catell DT, Haas JA - Front Oncol (2014)

Kaplan–Meier curve for overall survival. Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202727&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan–Meier curve for overall survival. Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population.
Mentions: The median follow-up for local control was 14.4 months. A total of seven local failures occurred in this study. The median time to local failure was 17 months with a range from 5 to 53 months. The 2-year local control rate was 87% (Figure 1). Median follow-up for overall survival was 18.8 months. The 2-year overall survival was 68% in this patient population (Figure 2). There were 16 cases (22%) of mediastinal failure, and 10 cases (14%) of distant metastases. There were 25 cases (34%) of recurrence of any form. The 2-year recurrence-free survival was 48.3% (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The median age was 78.5 years.Fifty-four percent of the patient population was female.Sixty seven percent of the tumors were stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were stage IB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Radiation Oncology, Winthrop-University Hospital , New York, NY , USA ; Stony Brook School of Medicine , New York, NY , USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose/objective(s): Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to have increased local control and overall survival relative to conventional external beam radiation therapy in patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Excellent rates of local control have been demonstrated both in clinical trials and in single-center studies at large academic institutions. However, there is limited data on the experiences of small academic hospitals with SBRT for stage I NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to report the local control and overall survival rates in patients treated with SBRT for stage I NSCLC at Winthrop-University Hospital (WUH), a small academic hospital.

Materials/methods: This is a retrospective review of 78 stage I central and peripheral NSCLC tumors treated between December 2006 and July 2012 with SBRT at WUH. Treatment was given utilizing fiducials and a respiratory tracking system. If the fiducials were not trackable, a spine tracking system was used for tumor localization. CT-based planning was performed using the ray trace algorithm. Treatment was delivered over consecutive days to a median dose of 4800 cGy delivered in four fractions. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate local control and overall survival.

Results: The median age was 78.5 years. Fifty-four percent of the patient population was female. Sixty seven percent of the tumors were stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were stage IB. Fifty-three percent of the tumors were adenocarcinomas and 29% were squamous cell carcinomas, with the remainder being of unknown histology or NSCLC, not otherwise specified The 2-year local control rate was 87%, and the 2-year overall survival was 68%.

Conclusion: Our findings support that local control and overall survival at a small academic hospital are comparable to that of larger academic institutions' published experiences with SBRT for stage I NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus