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Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae.

Heroven AK, Dersch P - Front Cell Infect Microbiol (2014)

Bottom Line: In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and interbacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly.Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability.Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Infection Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Institut für Mikrobiology, Technische Universität Braunschweig Braunschweig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g., soil, plants, insects) as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g., rodents, pigs, humans) with a particular preference for lymphatic tissues. In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and interbacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly. In addition, nutrient availability has an impact on expression of virulence genes in response to C-sources, demonstrating a tight link between the pathogenicity of yersiniae and utilization of nutrients. Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability. Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Lifestyles and pathogenesis of the human pathogenic Yersinia species. The enteropathogenic Yersinia species Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are associated with meat (mainly pork) and lettuce/vegetables. They are ingested via contaminated food and enter the lymphatic system through the M cells in the small intestine. The main reservoirs of Y. pestis are rodents. Transmission of the bacteria to humans occurs through the bite of an infected flea resulting in bubonic plague. Pneumonic plague is developed when Y. pestis reaches the lung and is transmitted via respiratory droplets.
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Figure 1: Lifestyles and pathogenesis of the human pathogenic Yersinia species. The enteropathogenic Yersinia species Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are associated with meat (mainly pork) and lettuce/vegetables. They are ingested via contaminated food and enter the lymphatic system through the M cells in the small intestine. The main reservoirs of Y. pestis are rodents. Transmission of the bacteria to humans occurs through the bite of an infected flea resulting in bubonic plague. Pneumonic plague is developed when Y. pestis reaches the lung and is transmitted via respiratory droplets.

Mentions: Both enteric Yersinia species cause various gut-associated symptoms (e.g., enteritis, ileitis, diarrhea, and mesenteric lymphadenitis) commonly called yersiniosis. Only in very rare cases they can lead to systemic infections and induce extra-intestinal sequelae such as erythema nodosum and reactive arthritis (Koornhof et al., 1999). Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica can occupy many different environmental habitats and have been isolated from ground water, soil, plants, and insects. In addition, certain domestic and wild animals were shown to be reservoirs for enteropathogenic Yersinia species (Fredriksson-Ahomaa et al., 2006; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, 2012). Both enteric Yersinia species are transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Undercooked pork meat is considered to be the major infection source of Y. enterocolitica (Bottone, 1997), and vegetables and lettuce for Y. pseudotuberculosis (Figure 1).


Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae.

Heroven AK, Dersch P - Front Cell Infect Microbiol (2014)

Lifestyles and pathogenesis of the human pathogenic Yersinia species. The enteropathogenic Yersinia species Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are associated with meat (mainly pork) and lettuce/vegetables. They are ingested via contaminated food and enter the lymphatic system through the M cells in the small intestine. The main reservoirs of Y. pestis are rodents. Transmission of the bacteria to humans occurs through the bite of an infected flea resulting in bubonic plague. Pneumonic plague is developed when Y. pestis reaches the lung and is transmitted via respiratory droplets.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202721&req=5

Figure 1: Lifestyles and pathogenesis of the human pathogenic Yersinia species. The enteropathogenic Yersinia species Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are associated with meat (mainly pork) and lettuce/vegetables. They are ingested via contaminated food and enter the lymphatic system through the M cells in the small intestine. The main reservoirs of Y. pestis are rodents. Transmission of the bacteria to humans occurs through the bite of an infected flea resulting in bubonic plague. Pneumonic plague is developed when Y. pestis reaches the lung and is transmitted via respiratory droplets.
Mentions: Both enteric Yersinia species cause various gut-associated symptoms (e.g., enteritis, ileitis, diarrhea, and mesenteric lymphadenitis) commonly called yersiniosis. Only in very rare cases they can lead to systemic infections and induce extra-intestinal sequelae such as erythema nodosum and reactive arthritis (Koornhof et al., 1999). Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica can occupy many different environmental habitats and have been isolated from ground water, soil, plants, and insects. In addition, certain domestic and wild animals were shown to be reservoirs for enteropathogenic Yersinia species (Fredriksson-Ahomaa et al., 2006; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, 2012). Both enteric Yersinia species are transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Undercooked pork meat is considered to be the major infection source of Y. enterocolitica (Bottone, 1997), and vegetables and lettuce for Y. pseudotuberculosis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and interbacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly.Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability.Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Infection Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Institut für Mikrobiology, Technische Universität Braunschweig Braunschweig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g., soil, plants, insects) as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g., rodents, pigs, humans) with a particular preference for lymphatic tissues. In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and interbacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly. In addition, nutrient availability has an impact on expression of virulence genes in response to C-sources, demonstrating a tight link between the pathogenicity of yersiniae and utilization of nutrients. Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability. Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus