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How air influences radiation dose deposition in multiwell culture plates: a Monte Carlo simulation of radiation geometry.

Sabater S, Berenguer R, Honrubia-Gomez P, Rivera M, Nuñez A, Jimenez-Jimenez E, Martos A, Ramirez-Castillejo C - J. Radiat. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiation of experimental culture cells on plates with various wells can cause a risk of underdosage as a result of the existence of multiple air-water interfaces.Radiation conditions were simulated with the GAMOS code, based on the GEANT4 code, and this was compared with a simulation performed with PENELOPE and measured data.We believe that this underdosage does not have a significant effect on the dose received by culture cells deposited in a monolayer and adhered to the base of the wells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), C/ Hnos Falcó 37, 02006 Albacete, Spain ssabaterm@gmail.com.

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A 6-well plate photo and 96-well plate drawn showing the multiple air spaces in and around each well.
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RRU022F1: A 6-well plate photo and 96-well plate drawn showing the multiple air spaces in and around each well.

Mentions: Irradiation is a primary tool in biological research. A great number of experimental biological studies involve and have involved culture plate irradiation. In spite of this fact, very few studies have analyzed their radiation geometry and validated the method employed. Normally when calculating the dose received to a culture plate, the total of the irradiated plate is considered to be an homogenous volume of water; in fact, cells plated in multiwell culture plates are surrounded by large amounts of air because of the existence of air cavities in such labware products. Air cavities exist in, around and within the well-plates and above the culture medium, which partially fills the well volume (Figs 1 and 2).Fig. 1.


How air influences radiation dose deposition in multiwell culture plates: a Monte Carlo simulation of radiation geometry.

Sabater S, Berenguer R, Honrubia-Gomez P, Rivera M, Nuñez A, Jimenez-Jimenez E, Martos A, Ramirez-Castillejo C - J. Radiat. Res. (2014)

A 6-well plate photo and 96-well plate drawn showing the multiple air spaces in and around each well.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4202281&req=5

RRU022F1: A 6-well plate photo and 96-well plate drawn showing the multiple air spaces in and around each well.
Mentions: Irradiation is a primary tool in biological research. A great number of experimental biological studies involve and have involved culture plate irradiation. In spite of this fact, very few studies have analyzed their radiation geometry and validated the method employed. Normally when calculating the dose received to a culture plate, the total of the irradiated plate is considered to be an homogenous volume of water; in fact, cells plated in multiwell culture plates are surrounded by large amounts of air because of the existence of air cavities in such labware products. Air cavities exist in, around and within the well-plates and above the culture medium, which partially fills the well volume (Figs 1 and 2).Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Radiation of experimental culture cells on plates with various wells can cause a risk of underdosage as a result of the existence of multiple air-water interfaces.Radiation conditions were simulated with the GAMOS code, based on the GEANT4 code, and this was compared with a simulation performed with PENELOPE and measured data.We believe that this underdosage does not have a significant effect on the dose received by culture cells deposited in a monolayer and adhered to the base of the wells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), C/ Hnos Falcó 37, 02006 Albacete, Spain ssabaterm@gmail.com.

Show MeSH