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Dynamic changes in macrophage activation and proliferation during the development and resolution of intestinal inflammation.

Little MC, Hurst RJ, Else KJ - J. Immunol. (2014)

Bottom Line: However, little is known about the proliferation and activation state of Mφ subsets in the gut during the development and resolution of intestinal inflammation.Classically activated Mφs predominate initially (as the inflammation develops) and then, following worm expulsion (as the inflammation resolves), both the resident and inflammatory populations of Mφs become alternatively activated.This study provides a novel insight into the phenotype and behavior of intestinal Mφ during infection-driven inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom matthew.c.little@manchester.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The adaptive immune response following T. muris infection. Three different strains of mouse (AKR, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) were either left uninfected or infected with a high level of T. muris ova. MLN cells were isolated from uninfected mice (0 d postinfection) and infected mice at various time points postinfection and stimulated in vitro for 48 h with T. muris E/S Ag. The supernatant was analyzed for cytokines using a Cytokine Bead Array kit. The values are the means + SEM of five mice in each group. The experiment was repeated at days 0 and 21 only. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 (time points postinfection compared with uninfected).
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fig02: The adaptive immune response following T. muris infection. Three different strains of mouse (AKR, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) were either left uninfected or infected with a high level of T. muris ova. MLN cells were isolated from uninfected mice (0 d postinfection) and infected mice at various time points postinfection and stimulated in vitro for 48 h with T. muris E/S Ag. The supernatant was analyzed for cytokines using a Cytokine Bead Array kit. The values are the means + SEM of five mice in each group. The experiment was repeated at days 0 and 21 only. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 (time points postinfection compared with uninfected).

Mentions: After day 35 postinfection, Ag-stimulated MLN cells from AKR mice released high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A. Furthermore, on day 42, IL-13, but not IL-5, was also released (Fig. 2), revealing that AKR mice mounted strong Th1 and Th17 responses (and also a delayed and muted Th2 response) to the parasite. In contrast, Ag-stimulated MLN cells from BALB/c mice produced high levels of IL-5 and IL-13, but not IFN-γ postinfection. This was accompanied by a small but significant increase in IL-17A on day 42 (Fig. 2). Therefore, BALB/c mice mounted a strong Th2 response (and also a weak and delayed Th17 response) to T. muris. MLN cells from C57BL/6 mice released high levels of all four cytokines after day 21 postinfection (Fig. 2). Therefore, C57BL/6 mice mounted strong Th1, Th2, and Th17 responses. AKR mice failed to expel T. muris and a chronic infection ensued. In contrast, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were both resistant. However, BALB/c mice expelled the parasite more rapidly than C57BL/6 mice (Fig. 3A).


Dynamic changes in macrophage activation and proliferation during the development and resolution of intestinal inflammation.

Little MC, Hurst RJ, Else KJ - J. Immunol. (2014)

The adaptive immune response following T. muris infection. Three different strains of mouse (AKR, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) were either left uninfected or infected with a high level of T. muris ova. MLN cells were isolated from uninfected mice (0 d postinfection) and infected mice at various time points postinfection and stimulated in vitro for 48 h with T. muris E/S Ag. The supernatant was analyzed for cytokines using a Cytokine Bead Array kit. The values are the means + SEM of five mice in each group. The experiment was repeated at days 0 and 21 only. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 (time points postinfection compared with uninfected).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4201944&req=5

fig02: The adaptive immune response following T. muris infection. Three different strains of mouse (AKR, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) were either left uninfected or infected with a high level of T. muris ova. MLN cells were isolated from uninfected mice (0 d postinfection) and infected mice at various time points postinfection and stimulated in vitro for 48 h with T. muris E/S Ag. The supernatant was analyzed for cytokines using a Cytokine Bead Array kit. The values are the means + SEM of five mice in each group. The experiment was repeated at days 0 and 21 only. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 (time points postinfection compared with uninfected).
Mentions: After day 35 postinfection, Ag-stimulated MLN cells from AKR mice released high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A. Furthermore, on day 42, IL-13, but not IL-5, was also released (Fig. 2), revealing that AKR mice mounted strong Th1 and Th17 responses (and also a delayed and muted Th2 response) to the parasite. In contrast, Ag-stimulated MLN cells from BALB/c mice produced high levels of IL-5 and IL-13, but not IFN-γ postinfection. This was accompanied by a small but significant increase in IL-17A on day 42 (Fig. 2). Therefore, BALB/c mice mounted a strong Th2 response (and also a weak and delayed Th17 response) to T. muris. MLN cells from C57BL/6 mice released high levels of all four cytokines after day 21 postinfection (Fig. 2). Therefore, C57BL/6 mice mounted strong Th1, Th2, and Th17 responses. AKR mice failed to expel T. muris and a chronic infection ensued. In contrast, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were both resistant. However, BALB/c mice expelled the parasite more rapidly than C57BL/6 mice (Fig. 3A).

Bottom Line: However, little is known about the proliferation and activation state of Mφ subsets in the gut during the development and resolution of intestinal inflammation.Classically activated Mφs predominate initially (as the inflammation develops) and then, following worm expulsion (as the inflammation resolves), both the resident and inflammatory populations of Mφs become alternatively activated.This study provides a novel insight into the phenotype and behavior of intestinal Mφ during infection-driven inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom matthew.c.little@manchester.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus