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Fidelity of implementation of an evidence-based HIV prevention program among Bahamian sixth grade students.

Wang B, Deveaux L, Knowles V, Koci V, Rolle G, Lunn S, Li X, Stanton B - Prev Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Youth did not appear to benefit from FOYC if two or fewer sessions were delivered.Prior training of teachers in the intervention curriculum, teacher perception of the importance of the intervention, and fewer years as a teacher are associated with implementation fidelity.Implementation fidelity is associated with improved student outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Prevention Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4707 St. Antoine, Suite W534, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA, bwang@med.wayne.edu.

ABSTRACT
The Bahamian Ministry of Education has elected to implement at a national level in all Bahamian government grade six classes an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention [Focus on Youth in the Caribbean (FOYC)]. This study explores fidelity of implementation of the intervention, factors that may influence implementation fidelity, and the impact of variations in the implementation fidelity on student outcomes. Data were collected in the first wave of national implementation in 2011, involving 35 government primary schools and 110 teachers and 2,811 students. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the relationships among factors which facilitated or impeded teachers' implementation of FOYC. Results indicate that teachers taught 16.3 out of 30 core activities, 24.9 out of 46 total activities, and 4.4 out of 8 sessions on average. The strongest predictor of implementation fidelity was teacher comfort level with the FOYC curriculum. Teachers who did not perceive the FOYC intervention to be important for their students or who had attended only part of a FOYC training workshop were more likely to change the curriculum. Increased duration of experience as a teacher (>10 years) was negatively associated with fidelity of implementation. Teacher's perception of the importance of the FOYC intervention and implementation fidelity had direct positive effects on students' HIV/AIDS knowledge, reproductive health skills, protective intentions, and self-efficacy. Youth did not appear to benefit from FOYC if two or fewer sessions were delivered. We concluded that an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention can be implemented at a national level. Prior training of teachers in the intervention curriculum, teacher perception of the importance of the intervention, and fewer years as a teacher are associated with implementation fidelity. Implementation fidelity is associated with improved student outcomes.

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Revised structural model of the relationships among factors influencing teacher’s fidelity of implementation of FOYC intervention and student’s knowledge, skill, perception, and intention outcomes. (Model fit: CFI = 0.942; TLI = 0.924; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; Chi-square/DF = 2.21)
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Fig3: Revised structural model of the relationships among factors influencing teacher’s fidelity of implementation of FOYC intervention and student’s knowledge, skill, perception, and intention outcomes. (Model fit: CFI = 0.942; TLI = 0.924; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; Chi-square/DF = 2.21)

Mentions: The revised structural model demonstrated the relationship among factors and their direct and indirect effects on fidelity of implementation and student outcomes (Fig. 3). There were six manifest exogenous variables and two latent endogenous variables (e.g., fidelity of implementation and student’s outcomes) in the model. The overall fit of the revised model was good (CFI = 0.94; TLI = 0.92; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; χ2/df = 2.21). The analysis revealed an R2 value of 0.27 for fidelity of implementation and of 0.30 for student’s outcomes.Fig. 3


Fidelity of implementation of an evidence-based HIV prevention program among Bahamian sixth grade students.

Wang B, Deveaux L, Knowles V, Koci V, Rolle G, Lunn S, Li X, Stanton B - Prev Sci (2015)

Revised structural model of the relationships among factors influencing teacher’s fidelity of implementation of FOYC intervention and student’s knowledge, skill, perception, and intention outcomes. (Model fit: CFI = 0.942; TLI = 0.924; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; Chi-square/DF = 2.21)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199933&req=5

Fig3: Revised structural model of the relationships among factors influencing teacher’s fidelity of implementation of FOYC intervention and student’s knowledge, skill, perception, and intention outcomes. (Model fit: CFI = 0.942; TLI = 0.924; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; Chi-square/DF = 2.21)
Mentions: The revised structural model demonstrated the relationship among factors and their direct and indirect effects on fidelity of implementation and student outcomes (Fig. 3). There were six manifest exogenous variables and two latent endogenous variables (e.g., fidelity of implementation and student’s outcomes) in the model. The overall fit of the revised model was good (CFI = 0.94; TLI = 0.92; RMEA = 0.08; SRMR = 0.06; χ2/df = 2.21). The analysis revealed an R2 value of 0.27 for fidelity of implementation and of 0.30 for student’s outcomes.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Youth did not appear to benefit from FOYC if two or fewer sessions were delivered.Prior training of teachers in the intervention curriculum, teacher perception of the importance of the intervention, and fewer years as a teacher are associated with implementation fidelity.Implementation fidelity is associated with improved student outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pediatric Prevention Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4707 St. Antoine, Suite W534, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA, bwang@med.wayne.edu.

ABSTRACT
The Bahamian Ministry of Education has elected to implement at a national level in all Bahamian government grade six classes an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention [Focus on Youth in the Caribbean (FOYC)]. This study explores fidelity of implementation of the intervention, factors that may influence implementation fidelity, and the impact of variations in the implementation fidelity on student outcomes. Data were collected in the first wave of national implementation in 2011, involving 35 government primary schools and 110 teachers and 2,811 students. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the relationships among factors which facilitated or impeded teachers' implementation of FOYC. Results indicate that teachers taught 16.3 out of 30 core activities, 24.9 out of 46 total activities, and 4.4 out of 8 sessions on average. The strongest predictor of implementation fidelity was teacher comfort level with the FOYC curriculum. Teachers who did not perceive the FOYC intervention to be important for their students or who had attended only part of a FOYC training workshop were more likely to change the curriculum. Increased duration of experience as a teacher (>10 years) was negatively associated with fidelity of implementation. Teacher's perception of the importance of the FOYC intervention and implementation fidelity had direct positive effects on students' HIV/AIDS knowledge, reproductive health skills, protective intentions, and self-efficacy. Youth did not appear to benefit from FOYC if two or fewer sessions were delivered. We concluded that an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention can be implemented at a national level. Prior training of teachers in the intervention curriculum, teacher perception of the importance of the intervention, and fewer years as a teacher are associated with implementation fidelity. Implementation fidelity is associated with improved student outcomes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus