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Gastric adenocarcinoma with thymic metastasis after curative resection: a case report.

Matsunaga T, Saito H, Miyatani K, Takaya S, Fukumoto Y, Osaki T, Ikeguchi M - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: In contrast, metastasis to the thymus is rare.The patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery to remove the tumor.Thymic metastasis was considered likely based on the location of the tumor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Tottori University School of Medicine, Yonago, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The peritoneum is the most frequent site of recurrence for gastric cancer after gastrectomy, followed by the liver and lymph nodes. In contrast, metastasis to the thymus is rare. Annual surveillance with computed tomography was performed on a 67-year-old man who previously underwent a distal gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection for gastric cancer at Tottori University. Five years after the initial operation, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected by computed tomography. The patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery to remove the tumor. Histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma cells similar to those of the gastric cancer resected 5 years previously. Thymic metastasis was considered likely based on the location of the tumor. The recognition that gastric cancer can metastasize to unusual anatomic locations, such as the thymus, can facilitate an accurate, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastrofibroscopy showed a type 0-IIa+IIc lesion with a maximum size of 20 mm in the posterior side of the lower third of the stomach.
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Figure 1: Gastrofibroscopy showed a type 0-IIa+IIc lesion with a maximum size of 20 mm in the posterior side of the lower third of the stomach.

Mentions: An asymptomatic 67-year-old man had a history of gastric adenocarcinoma (Fig. 1), for which he had undergone a distal partial gastrectomy 5 years previously. Histological examination of the resected specimen had revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma invading the muscularis propria with 5 regional lymph node metastases at stations 1 (3/7), 3 (1/1), and 7 (1/1). The disease was stage IIB as defined by the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.2 The patient received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 (100 mg/body). However, he could only take 1 course of chemotherapy because of severe diarrhea.


Gastric adenocarcinoma with thymic metastasis after curative resection: a case report.

Matsunaga T, Saito H, Miyatani K, Takaya S, Fukumoto Y, Osaki T, Ikeguchi M - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

Gastrofibroscopy showed a type 0-IIa+IIc lesion with a maximum size of 20 mm in the posterior side of the lower third of the stomach.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199889&req=5

Figure 1: Gastrofibroscopy showed a type 0-IIa+IIc lesion with a maximum size of 20 mm in the posterior side of the lower third of the stomach.
Mentions: An asymptomatic 67-year-old man had a history of gastric adenocarcinoma (Fig. 1), for which he had undergone a distal partial gastrectomy 5 years previously. Histological examination of the resected specimen had revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma invading the muscularis propria with 5 regional lymph node metastases at stations 1 (3/7), 3 (1/1), and 7 (1/1). The disease was stage IIB as defined by the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.2 The patient received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 (100 mg/body). However, he could only take 1 course of chemotherapy because of severe diarrhea.

Bottom Line: In contrast, metastasis to the thymus is rare.The patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery to remove the tumor.Thymic metastasis was considered likely based on the location of the tumor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Tottori University School of Medicine, Yonago, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The peritoneum is the most frequent site of recurrence for gastric cancer after gastrectomy, followed by the liver and lymph nodes. In contrast, metastasis to the thymus is rare. Annual surveillance with computed tomography was performed on a 67-year-old man who previously underwent a distal gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection for gastric cancer at Tottori University. Five years after the initial operation, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected by computed tomography. The patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery to remove the tumor. Histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma cells similar to those of the gastric cancer resected 5 years previously. Thymic metastasis was considered likely based on the location of the tumor. The recognition that gastric cancer can metastasize to unusual anatomic locations, such as the thymus, can facilitate an accurate, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus