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Gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by a fish bone mimicking a gastric submucosal tumor.

Kim SW, Kim SW, Song SK - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare.Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy.However, an impacted fish bone was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daege, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, which revealed an intact gastric wall with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, an impacted fish bone was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The foreign body found protruding from the stomach is a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone.
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Figure 3: The foreign body found protruding from the stomach is a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone.

Mentions: Non-contrast and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-defined heterogeneous enhancing mass, approximately 3 cm in size, on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum (Fig. 2), suggestive of a submucosal tumor such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, schwannoma, or leiomyoma. No evidence of distant metastasis or significant lymph node enlargement was noted. Laparoscopic surgery showed that the mass was not present on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum but adhered to the pancreas. After adhesiolysis, we incidentally found and biopsied the pancreatic mass-like lesion. Frozen section indicated the absence of a pathologic lesion. The gastric wall appeared to be intact with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, on squeezing the gastric wall, the serosa of the adherent posterior wall was found to be torn. A foreign body protruding from the tear was found to be a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone (Fig. 3). The procedure was completed with the suturing of the injured serosa with 2 stitches. These findings indicate that the mass-like lesion was a gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by the impacted fish bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful.


Gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by a fish bone mimicking a gastric submucosal tumor.

Kim SW, Kim SW, Song SK - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

The foreign body found protruding from the stomach is a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199888&req=5

Figure 3: The foreign body found protruding from the stomach is a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone.
Mentions: Non-contrast and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-defined heterogeneous enhancing mass, approximately 3 cm in size, on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum (Fig. 2), suggestive of a submucosal tumor such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, schwannoma, or leiomyoma. No evidence of distant metastasis or significant lymph node enlargement was noted. Laparoscopic surgery showed that the mass was not present on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum but adhered to the pancreas. After adhesiolysis, we incidentally found and biopsied the pancreatic mass-like lesion. Frozen section indicated the absence of a pathologic lesion. The gastric wall appeared to be intact with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, on squeezing the gastric wall, the serosa of the adherent posterior wall was found to be torn. A foreign body protruding from the tear was found to be a 2.5×0.2-cm fish bone (Fig. 3). The procedure was completed with the suturing of the injured serosa with 2 stitches. These findings indicate that the mass-like lesion was a gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by the impacted fish bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful.

Bottom Line: Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare.Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy.However, an impacted fish bone was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daege, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, which revealed an intact gastric wall with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, an impacted fish bone was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus