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Gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by a fish bone mimicking a gastric submucosal tumor.

Kim SW, Kim SW, Song SK - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare.Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy.However, an impacted fish bone was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daege, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, which revealed an intact gastric wall with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, an impacted fish bone was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastroscopic examination reveals a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum.
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Figure 1: Gastroscopic examination reveals a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum.

Mentions: A 59-year-old woman presented with a diagnosis of a gastric submucosal tumor detected incidentally during routine health screening. She had no known family history of gastrointestinal disorders or cancers. On admission, she had no symptom, including abdominal discomfort. Physical examination on admission revealed no abnormalities, and initial biochemical and hematologic test results for complete blood count, electrolyte levels, and liver function were all normal. Chest radiography revealed no abnormality, but gastroscopic examination revealed a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum (Fig. 1).


Gastric pseudotumoral lesion caused by a fish bone mimicking a gastric submucosal tumor.

Kim SW, Kim SW, Song SK - J Gastric Cancer (2014)

Gastroscopic examination reveals a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199888&req=5

Figure 1: Gastroscopic examination reveals a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum.
Mentions: A 59-year-old woman presented with a diagnosis of a gastric submucosal tumor detected incidentally during routine health screening. She had no known family history of gastrointestinal disorders or cancers. On admission, she had no symptom, including abdominal discomfort. Physical examination on admission revealed no abnormalities, and initial biochemical and hematologic test results for complete blood count, electrolyte levels, and liver function were all normal. Chest radiography revealed no abnormality, but gastroscopic examination revealed a bulging mucosa on the posterior wall of the gastric antrum (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare.Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy.However, an impacted fish bone was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daege, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastric complications following unintentional foreign body ingestion are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 59-year-old healthy woman who presented with nonspecific abdominal pain and an apparent gastric submucosal tumor that was incidentally detected by gastrofiberscopy. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, which revealed an intact gastric wall with no tumor invasion, deformity, or evidence of a gastric submucosal lesion. However, an impacted fish bone was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus