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European survey on the opinion and use of micronutrition in age-related macular degeneration: 10 years on from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

Aslam T, Delcourt C, Holz F, García-Layana A, Leys A, Silva RM, Souied E - Clin Ophthalmol (2014)

Bottom Line: Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies.Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologists' opinion of, and use of, micronutritional dietary supplements 10 years after publication of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) study.

Methods: Participation was solicited from 4,000 European ophthalmologists. Responding physicians were screened, and those treating at least 40 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) per month and prescribing nutrition supplements at least 4 times per month were admitted and completed a 40-item questionnaire.

Results: The surveyed sample included 112 general ophthalmologists and 104 retinal specialists. Most nutritional supplements (46%) were initiated when early/intermediate AMD was confirmed, although 18% were initiated on confirmation of neovascular AMD. Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies. Respondents considered lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, omega-3, and vitamins to be the most important components of nutritional supplements, with the results of AREDS2 already having been taken into consideration by many. Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.

Conclusion: Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists. Ophthalmologists choosing to use nutritional supplements are well-informed regarding current scientific studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Important criteria in the decision-making process (1= not important at all; 20= extremely important).
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f4-opth-8-2045: Important criteria in the decision-making process (1= not important at all; 20= extremely important).

Mentions: Cost, scientific support, and product characteristics were believed the most important components when considering a nutritional supplement (Figure 4). More scientific research (29%), improved efficacy (26%), and lower cost (26%) were thought the most important future expectations for the use of nutritional supplementation in AMD. The availability of new products was less frequently identified as an expectation (11%), along with small pill size and lower dosing frequency. More communications campaigns and the development of new modes of administration were rated as expectations by 10% or fewer of the respondents.


European survey on the opinion and use of micronutrition in age-related macular degeneration: 10 years on from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

Aslam T, Delcourt C, Holz F, García-Layana A, Leys A, Silva RM, Souied E - Clin Ophthalmol (2014)

Important criteria in the decision-making process (1= not important at all; 20= extremely important).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199852&req=5

f4-opth-8-2045: Important criteria in the decision-making process (1= not important at all; 20= extremely important).
Mentions: Cost, scientific support, and product characteristics were believed the most important components when considering a nutritional supplement (Figure 4). More scientific research (29%), improved efficacy (26%), and lower cost (26%) were thought the most important future expectations for the use of nutritional supplementation in AMD. The availability of new products was less frequently identified as an expectation (11%), along with small pill size and lower dosing frequency. More communications campaigns and the development of new modes of administration were rated as expectations by 10% or fewer of the respondents.

Bottom Line: Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies.Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologists' opinion of, and use of, micronutritional dietary supplements 10 years after publication of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) study.

Methods: Participation was solicited from 4,000 European ophthalmologists. Responding physicians were screened, and those treating at least 40 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) per month and prescribing nutrition supplements at least 4 times per month were admitted and completed a 40-item questionnaire.

Results: The surveyed sample included 112 general ophthalmologists and 104 retinal specialists. Most nutritional supplements (46%) were initiated when early/intermediate AMD was confirmed, although 18% were initiated on confirmation of neovascular AMD. Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies. Respondents considered lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, omega-3, and vitamins to be the most important components of nutritional supplements, with the results of AREDS2 already having been taken into consideration by many. Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.

Conclusion: Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists. Ophthalmologists choosing to use nutritional supplements are well-informed regarding current scientific studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus