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European survey on the opinion and use of micronutrition in age-related macular degeneration: 10 years on from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

Aslam T, Delcourt C, Holz F, García-Layana A, Leys A, Silva RM, Souied E - Clin Ophthalmol (2014)

Bottom Line: Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies.Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologists' opinion of, and use of, micronutritional dietary supplements 10 years after publication of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) study.

Methods: Participation was solicited from 4,000 European ophthalmologists. Responding physicians were screened, and those treating at least 40 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) per month and prescribing nutrition supplements at least 4 times per month were admitted and completed a 40-item questionnaire.

Results: The surveyed sample included 112 general ophthalmologists and 104 retinal specialists. Most nutritional supplements (46%) were initiated when early/intermediate AMD was confirmed, although 18% were initiated on confirmation of neovascular AMD. Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies. Respondents considered lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, omega-3, and vitamins to be the most important components of nutritional supplements, with the results of AREDS2 already having been taken into consideration by many. Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.

Conclusion: Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists. Ophthalmologists choosing to use nutritional supplements are well-informed regarding current scientific studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Important components in nutritional supplements.Abbreviations: DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; DPA, docosapentaenoic acid: EPA, eicosapentaenoic acid.
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f3-opth-8-2045: Important components in nutritional supplements.Abbreviations: DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; DPA, docosapentaenoic acid: EPA, eicosapentaenoic acid.

Mentions: There was a wide spectrum of opinions regarding the most important components for nutritional supplements (Figure 3). The most important spontaneous answers were lutein (77%; 81% general ophthalmologist, 72% retinal specialist), omega-3 (72%; 79% general ophthalmologist, 64% retinal specialist), and zeaxanthin (68%; 72% general ophthalmologist, 62% retinal specialist). Among the list of all the components, lutein, omega-3, zeaxanthin, zinc, and vitamin E were considered as very important by more than 50% of respondents. Resveratrol was considered to be a very important component by 26% of ophthalmologists (30% general ophthalmologist, 21% retinal specialist). Although a pattern is difficult to discern, there were important national differences in the importance attached to various components of nutritional supplements. The most striking was that 90.6% of German ophthalmologists considered lutein to be an important component compared with the group average of 77%. In the UK, vitamins and fatty acids (including docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) were generally rated lower than other components, whereas French ophthalmologists rated pigments (71.9%) and vitamin D (34.4%) considerably higher than the group averages (33% and 13%, respectively). As well as interesting differences between individual countries and the group averages, there were also notable contrasts between individual countries: German and Belgian ophthalmologists considered neoxanthin and astaxanthin as among the least-important components (3.1% and 6.3% among the German ophthalmologists, respectively, and 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively, among the Belgian ophthalmologists compared with 56.7% and 43.3% of Italian ophthalmologists who considered them important). Belgian ophthalmologists were generally the most skeptical (identifying six of the 19 proposed substances as significantly [P<0.05] less important than the group average and rating none as significantly more important than the group average). In contrast, Italian ophthalmologists identified eleven of the 19 substances as being significantly more important than group average and none as less important than the group average), among them resveratrol (56.7% versus the overall average of 26%; Table 3).


European survey on the opinion and use of micronutrition in age-related macular degeneration: 10 years on from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

Aslam T, Delcourt C, Holz F, García-Layana A, Leys A, Silva RM, Souied E - Clin Ophthalmol (2014)

Important components in nutritional supplements.Abbreviations: DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; DPA, docosapentaenoic acid: EPA, eicosapentaenoic acid.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199852&req=5

f3-opth-8-2045: Important components in nutritional supplements.Abbreviations: DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; DPA, docosapentaenoic acid: EPA, eicosapentaenoic acid.
Mentions: There was a wide spectrum of opinions regarding the most important components for nutritional supplements (Figure 3). The most important spontaneous answers were lutein (77%; 81% general ophthalmologist, 72% retinal specialist), omega-3 (72%; 79% general ophthalmologist, 64% retinal specialist), and zeaxanthin (68%; 72% general ophthalmologist, 62% retinal specialist). Among the list of all the components, lutein, omega-3, zeaxanthin, zinc, and vitamin E were considered as very important by more than 50% of respondents. Resveratrol was considered to be a very important component by 26% of ophthalmologists (30% general ophthalmologist, 21% retinal specialist). Although a pattern is difficult to discern, there were important national differences in the importance attached to various components of nutritional supplements. The most striking was that 90.6% of German ophthalmologists considered lutein to be an important component compared with the group average of 77%. In the UK, vitamins and fatty acids (including docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) were generally rated lower than other components, whereas French ophthalmologists rated pigments (71.9%) and vitamin D (34.4%) considerably higher than the group averages (33% and 13%, respectively). As well as interesting differences between individual countries and the group averages, there were also notable contrasts between individual countries: German and Belgian ophthalmologists considered neoxanthin and astaxanthin as among the least-important components (3.1% and 6.3% among the German ophthalmologists, respectively, and 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively, among the Belgian ophthalmologists compared with 56.7% and 43.3% of Italian ophthalmologists who considered them important). Belgian ophthalmologists were generally the most skeptical (identifying six of the 19 proposed substances as significantly [P<0.05] less important than the group average and rating none as significantly more important than the group average). In contrast, Italian ophthalmologists identified eleven of the 19 substances as being significantly more important than group average and none as less important than the group average), among them resveratrol (56.7% versus the overall average of 26%; Table 3).

Bottom Line: Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies.Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologists' opinion of, and use of, micronutritional dietary supplements 10 years after publication of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) study.

Methods: Participation was solicited from 4,000 European ophthalmologists. Responding physicians were screened, and those treating at least 40 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) per month and prescribing nutrition supplements at least 4 times per month were admitted and completed a 40-item questionnaire.

Results: The surveyed sample included 112 general ophthalmologists and 104 retinal specialists. Most nutritional supplements (46%) were initiated when early/intermediate AMD was confirmed, although 18% were initiated on confirmation of neovascular AMD. Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies. Respondents considered lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, omega-3, and vitamins to be the most important components of nutritional supplements, with the results of AREDS2 already having been taken into consideration by many. Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.

Conclusion: Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists. Ophthalmologists choosing to use nutritional supplements are well-informed regarding current scientific studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus