Limits...
Self-efficacy enhancing intervention increases light physical activity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Larson JL, Covey MK, Kapella MC, Alex CG, McAuley E - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Differences were observed in light physical activity (LPA) after 4 months of training, time by group interaction effect (P=0.045).There were no significant changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time, or functional performance.Further work is needed to increase the magnitude and duration of effect, possibly by targeting LPA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Acute, Critical and Long-Term Care Programs, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA ; Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lead sedentary lives and could benefit from increasing their physical activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if an exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention could increase physical activity and functional performance when delivered in the context of 4 months of upper body resistance training with a 12-month follow-up.

Methods: IN THIS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL, SUBJECTS WERE ASSIGNED TO: exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention with upper body resistance training (SE-UBR), health education with upper body resistance training (ED-UBR), or health education with gentle chair exercises (ED-Chair). Physical activity was measured with an accelerometer and functional performance was measured with the Functional Performance Inventory. Forty-nine people with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed 4 months of training and provided valid accelerometry data, and 34 also provided accelerometry data at 12 months of follow-up. The self-efficacy enhancing intervention emphasized meeting physical activity guidelines and increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Results: Differences were observed in light physical activity (LPA) after 4 months of training, time by group interaction effect (P=0.045). The SE-UBR group increased time spent in LPA by +20.68±29.30 minutes/day and the other groups decreased time spent in LPA by -22.43±47.88 minutes/day and -25.73±51.76 minutes/day. Changes in LPA were not sustained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time, or functional performance. Subjects spent most of their waking hours sedentary: 72%±9% for SE-UBR, 68%±10% for ED-UBR, and 74%±9% for ED-Chair.

Conclusion: The self-efficacy enhancing intervention produced a modest short-term increase in LPA. Further work is needed to increase the magnitude and duration of effect, possibly by targeting LPA.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram.Note: *These subjects did not have useable accelerometry data for all three time points.Abbreviations: SE-UBR, self-efficacy and upper body resistance; ED-UBR, health education and upper body resistance; ED-Chair, health education and chair aerobics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199844&req=5

f1-copd-9-1081: Flow diagram.Note: *These subjects did not have useable accelerometry data for all three time points.Abbreviations: SE-UBR, self-efficacy and upper body resistance; ED-UBR, health education and upper body resistance; ED-Chair, health education and chair aerobics.

Mentions: Eighty-five subjects with moderate to severe COPD (71 men, 14 women; 13 blacks, 72 whites) were randomized to one of three groups. Sixty-four completed 4 months of training, and of these, 50 returned for measurements at 12 months after the completion of training (Figure 1). Some accelerometry data were not valid/useable because subjects failed to wear the monitor for the minimal time required, ie, they did not wear it for three days at least 10 hours a day. They either forgot or chose not to wear the device; some applied the device late and/or removed it early, and some provided two valid measures but did not provide all three. Adherence to the monitoring protocol tended to decline over the course of participation in the study. Sixty-eight subjects provided valid/useable accelerometry data at baseline before training, 56 after the end of 4 months of training, and 37 at 12 months’ follow-up. Forty-nine provided valid accelerometry data at both baseline and after 4 months of training, and 34 provided data at all three measurement points.


Self-efficacy enhancing intervention increases light physical activity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Larson JL, Covey MK, Kapella MC, Alex CG, McAuley E - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2014)

Flow diagram.Note: *These subjects did not have useable accelerometry data for all three time points.Abbreviations: SE-UBR, self-efficacy and upper body resistance; ED-UBR, health education and upper body resistance; ED-Chair, health education and chair aerobics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199844&req=5

f1-copd-9-1081: Flow diagram.Note: *These subjects did not have useable accelerometry data for all three time points.Abbreviations: SE-UBR, self-efficacy and upper body resistance; ED-UBR, health education and upper body resistance; ED-Chair, health education and chair aerobics.
Mentions: Eighty-five subjects with moderate to severe COPD (71 men, 14 women; 13 blacks, 72 whites) were randomized to one of three groups. Sixty-four completed 4 months of training, and of these, 50 returned for measurements at 12 months after the completion of training (Figure 1). Some accelerometry data were not valid/useable because subjects failed to wear the monitor for the minimal time required, ie, they did not wear it for three days at least 10 hours a day. They either forgot or chose not to wear the device; some applied the device late and/or removed it early, and some provided two valid measures but did not provide all three. Adherence to the monitoring protocol tended to decline over the course of participation in the study. Sixty-eight subjects provided valid/useable accelerometry data at baseline before training, 56 after the end of 4 months of training, and 37 at 12 months’ follow-up. Forty-nine provided valid accelerometry data at both baseline and after 4 months of training, and 34 provided data at all three measurement points.

Bottom Line: Differences were observed in light physical activity (LPA) after 4 months of training, time by group interaction effect (P=0.045).There were no significant changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time, or functional performance.Further work is needed to increase the magnitude and duration of effect, possibly by targeting LPA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Acute, Critical and Long-Term Care Programs, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA ; Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lead sedentary lives and could benefit from increasing their physical activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if an exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention could increase physical activity and functional performance when delivered in the context of 4 months of upper body resistance training with a 12-month follow-up.

Methods: IN THIS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL, SUBJECTS WERE ASSIGNED TO: exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention with upper body resistance training (SE-UBR), health education with upper body resistance training (ED-UBR), or health education with gentle chair exercises (ED-Chair). Physical activity was measured with an accelerometer and functional performance was measured with the Functional Performance Inventory. Forty-nine people with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed 4 months of training and provided valid accelerometry data, and 34 also provided accelerometry data at 12 months of follow-up. The self-efficacy enhancing intervention emphasized meeting physical activity guidelines and increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Results: Differences were observed in light physical activity (LPA) after 4 months of training, time by group interaction effect (P=0.045). The SE-UBR group increased time spent in LPA by +20.68±29.30 minutes/day and the other groups decreased time spent in LPA by -22.43±47.88 minutes/day and -25.73±51.76 minutes/day. Changes in LPA were not sustained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time, or functional performance. Subjects spent most of their waking hours sedentary: 72%±9% for SE-UBR, 68%±10% for ED-UBR, and 74%±9% for ED-Chair.

Conclusion: The self-efficacy enhancing intervention produced a modest short-term increase in LPA. Further work is needed to increase the magnitude and duration of effect, possibly by targeting LPA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus