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Widespread genomic incompatibilities in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Snoek LB, Orbidans HE, Stastna JJ, Aartse A, Rodriguez M, Riksen JA, Kammenga JE, Harvey SC - G3 (Bethesda) (2014)

Bottom Line: For two of the QTL regions, results are inconsistent with a model of pairwise interaction between two loci, suggesting that the incompatibilities are a consequence of complex interactions between multiple loci.Analysis of additional life history traits indicates that the QTL regions identified in these screens are associated with effects on other traits such as lifespan and reproduction, suggesting that the incompatibilities are likely to be deleterious.Taken together, these results indicate that numerous BDM incompatibilities that could contribute to reproductive isolation can be detected and mapped within C. elegans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Nematology, Wageningen University, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

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QTL mapping in the RILs and ILs. (A) Mapping of embryo stage in the RILs, with the significance (−log10(p)) multiplied by the sign of the effect of the N2 allele plotted against the marker positions in mega base pairs for the percentage of total eggs in stage I eggs (black solid line), stage II eggs (black dashed line), stage III eggs (black dotted line), stage IV eggs (gray solid line), L1s (gray dashed line), and the proportion of progeny > stage II (gray dotted line). (B) Genome-wide bin mapping of late-stage embryo production (proportion > stage II), showing the significance (−log10(p)) by chi-square test of ILs sharing a certain genomic part against N2. RILs, recombinant inbred lines; ILs, introgression lines.
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fig2: QTL mapping in the RILs and ILs. (A) Mapping of embryo stage in the RILs, with the significance (−log10(p)) multiplied by the sign of the effect of the N2 allele plotted against the marker positions in mega base pairs for the percentage of total eggs in stage I eggs (black solid line), stage II eggs (black dashed line), stage III eggs (black dotted line), stage IV eggs (gray solid line), L1s (gray dashed line), and the proportion of progeny > stage II (gray dotted line). (B) Genome-wide bin mapping of late-stage embryo production (proportion > stage II), showing the significance (−log10(p)) by chi-square test of ILs sharing a certain genomic part against N2. RILs, recombinant inbred lines; ILs, introgression lines.

Mentions: Preliminary experiments and the RIL and IL analyses indicated that N2 and CB4856 lay the majority of their eggs at very early stages of development. To investigate natural variation in this trait more broadly, we assayed, as described previously, a range of wild isolates. The IL ewIR51, which contains a CB4856 introgression on chromosome IV that results in the production of large numbers of late stage progeny (see Figure 2 and Figure S2), was included in these assays as a control.


Widespread genomic incompatibilities in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Snoek LB, Orbidans HE, Stastna JJ, Aartse A, Rodriguez M, Riksen JA, Kammenga JE, Harvey SC - G3 (Bethesda) (2014)

QTL mapping in the RILs and ILs. (A) Mapping of embryo stage in the RILs, with the significance (−log10(p)) multiplied by the sign of the effect of the N2 allele plotted against the marker positions in mega base pairs for the percentage of total eggs in stage I eggs (black solid line), stage II eggs (black dashed line), stage III eggs (black dotted line), stage IV eggs (gray solid line), L1s (gray dashed line), and the proportion of progeny > stage II (gray dotted line). (B) Genome-wide bin mapping of late-stage embryo production (proportion > stage II), showing the significance (−log10(p)) by chi-square test of ILs sharing a certain genomic part against N2. RILs, recombinant inbred lines; ILs, introgression lines.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199689&req=5

fig2: QTL mapping in the RILs and ILs. (A) Mapping of embryo stage in the RILs, with the significance (−log10(p)) multiplied by the sign of the effect of the N2 allele plotted against the marker positions in mega base pairs for the percentage of total eggs in stage I eggs (black solid line), stage II eggs (black dashed line), stage III eggs (black dotted line), stage IV eggs (gray solid line), L1s (gray dashed line), and the proportion of progeny > stage II (gray dotted line). (B) Genome-wide bin mapping of late-stage embryo production (proportion > stage II), showing the significance (−log10(p)) by chi-square test of ILs sharing a certain genomic part against N2. RILs, recombinant inbred lines; ILs, introgression lines.
Mentions: Preliminary experiments and the RIL and IL analyses indicated that N2 and CB4856 lay the majority of their eggs at very early stages of development. To investigate natural variation in this trait more broadly, we assayed, as described previously, a range of wild isolates. The IL ewIR51, which contains a CB4856 introgression on chromosome IV that results in the production of large numbers of late stage progeny (see Figure 2 and Figure S2), was included in these assays as a control.

Bottom Line: For two of the QTL regions, results are inconsistent with a model of pairwise interaction between two loci, suggesting that the incompatibilities are a consequence of complex interactions between multiple loci.Analysis of additional life history traits indicates that the QTL regions identified in these screens are associated with effects on other traits such as lifespan and reproduction, suggesting that the incompatibilities are likely to be deleterious.Taken together, these results indicate that numerous BDM incompatibilities that could contribute to reproductive isolation can be detected and mapped within C. elegans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Nematology, Wageningen University, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus