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The evolutionary history and spatiotemporal dynamics of the fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV) in China.

Huang X, Liu L, Du Y, Wu W, Wang H, Su J, Tang X, Liu Q, Yang Y, Jiang Y, Chen W, Xu B - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: The speed of FTLSV movement has increased in recent decades, likely facilitated by modern human activity and ecosystem changes.Results presented in the manuscript suggest that the Huaiyangshan area is likely be the origin of FTLSV in China and identified probable viral migration routes.These results provide new insights into the origin and spread of FTLSV in China, and provide a foundation for future virological surveillance and control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for disease control and prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2007, a novel bunyavirus was found in Henan Province, China and named fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV); since then, FTLSV has been found in ticks and animals in many Chinese provinces. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, indicating that FTLSV should be considered a potential public health threat. Determining the historical spread of FTLSV could help curtail its spread and prevent future movement of this virus.

Method/principal findings: To examine the pattern of FTLSV evolution and the origin of outbreak strains, as well to examine the rate of evolution, the genome of 12 FTLSV strains were sequenced and a phylogenetic and Bayesian phylogeographic analysis of all available FTLSV sequences in China were performed. Analysis based on the FTLSV L segment suggests that the virus likely originated somewhere in Huaiyangshan circa 1790 (95% highest probability density interval: 1756-1817) and began spreading around 1806 (95% highest probability density interval: 1773-1834). Analysis also indicates that when FTLSV arrived in Jiangsu province from Huaiyangshan, Jiangsu Province became another source for the spread of the disease. Bayesian factor test analysis identified three major transmission routes: Huaiyangshan to Jiangsu, Jiangsu to Liaoning, and Jiangsu to Shandong. The speed of FTLSV movement has increased in recent decades, likely facilitated by modern human activity and ecosystem changes. In addition, evidence of RNA segment reassortment was found in FTLSV; purifying selection appears to have been the dominant force in the evolution of this virus.

Conclusion: Results presented in the manuscript suggest that the Huaiyangshan area is likely be the origin of FTLSV in China and identified probable viral migration routes. These results provide new insights into the origin and spread of FTLSV in China, and provide a foundation for future virological surveillance and control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bayesian coalescent analysis of FTLSV based on the S segment.Maximum clade credibility and Maximum likelihood tree is shown with posterior probability values and bootstrap value depicted at the nodes. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using Mrbayes 3.2.1 and Mega software 5, respectively. Designations of the different FTLSV phylogroups (A,B,C,E,F clade) are as indicated, based on previously defined assignments. These sequences are described in more detail in Table 1. The sequences from Japan were included in this analysis.
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pntd-0003237-g003: Bayesian coalescent analysis of FTLSV based on the S segment.Maximum clade credibility and Maximum likelihood tree is shown with posterior probability values and bootstrap value depicted at the nodes. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using Mrbayes 3.2.1 and Mega software 5, respectively. Designations of the different FTLSV phylogroups (A,B,C,E,F clade) are as indicated, based on previously defined assignments. These sequences are described in more detail in Table 1. The sequences from Japan were included in this analysis.

Mentions: For the three viral RNA segments, Bayesian analysis yielded highly supported tree topologies that were consistent with the ML results (Figures 1, 2 and 3). Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of the five genotypes previously identified in China (designated A–E) [4], [31] and clustered the Japanese FTLSV strains, into a novel genotypic group. The Chinese genotypes were representive of the locations in China with the greatest burden of FTLS (Jiangsu, Henan, Liaoning, Shandong, Anhui, and Hubei Provinces and the Huaiyangshan region). Strains isolated from animals mainly clustered into the A lineage based on L and M analysis; however, the analysis of the S segments indicated that animal-isolated strains also included B and C genotypes. Strains isolated as part of this study were classified into A, B, D and E genotypes (Figures 1, 2 and 3).


The evolutionary history and spatiotemporal dynamics of the fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV) in China.

Huang X, Liu L, Du Y, Wu W, Wang H, Su J, Tang X, Liu Q, Yang Y, Jiang Y, Chen W, Xu B - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Bayesian coalescent analysis of FTLSV based on the S segment.Maximum clade credibility and Maximum likelihood tree is shown with posterior probability values and bootstrap value depicted at the nodes. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using Mrbayes 3.2.1 and Mega software 5, respectively. Designations of the different FTLSV phylogroups (A,B,C,E,F clade) are as indicated, based on previously defined assignments. These sequences are described in more detail in Table 1. The sequences from Japan were included in this analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199521&req=5

pntd-0003237-g003: Bayesian coalescent analysis of FTLSV based on the S segment.Maximum clade credibility and Maximum likelihood tree is shown with posterior probability values and bootstrap value depicted at the nodes. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using Mrbayes 3.2.1 and Mega software 5, respectively. Designations of the different FTLSV phylogroups (A,B,C,E,F clade) are as indicated, based on previously defined assignments. These sequences are described in more detail in Table 1. The sequences from Japan were included in this analysis.
Mentions: For the three viral RNA segments, Bayesian analysis yielded highly supported tree topologies that were consistent with the ML results (Figures 1, 2 and 3). Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of the five genotypes previously identified in China (designated A–E) [4], [31] and clustered the Japanese FTLSV strains, into a novel genotypic group. The Chinese genotypes were representive of the locations in China with the greatest burden of FTLS (Jiangsu, Henan, Liaoning, Shandong, Anhui, and Hubei Provinces and the Huaiyangshan region). Strains isolated from animals mainly clustered into the A lineage based on L and M analysis; however, the analysis of the S segments indicated that animal-isolated strains also included B and C genotypes. Strains isolated as part of this study were classified into A, B, D and E genotypes (Figures 1, 2 and 3).

Bottom Line: The speed of FTLSV movement has increased in recent decades, likely facilitated by modern human activity and ecosystem changes.Results presented in the manuscript suggest that the Huaiyangshan area is likely be the origin of FTLSV in China and identified probable viral migration routes.These results provide new insights into the origin and spread of FTLSV in China, and provide a foundation for future virological surveillance and control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for disease control and prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2007, a novel bunyavirus was found in Henan Province, China and named fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV); since then, FTLSV has been found in ticks and animals in many Chinese provinces. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, indicating that FTLSV should be considered a potential public health threat. Determining the historical spread of FTLSV could help curtail its spread and prevent future movement of this virus.

Method/principal findings: To examine the pattern of FTLSV evolution and the origin of outbreak strains, as well to examine the rate of evolution, the genome of 12 FTLSV strains were sequenced and a phylogenetic and Bayesian phylogeographic analysis of all available FTLSV sequences in China were performed. Analysis based on the FTLSV L segment suggests that the virus likely originated somewhere in Huaiyangshan circa 1790 (95% highest probability density interval: 1756-1817) and began spreading around 1806 (95% highest probability density interval: 1773-1834). Analysis also indicates that when FTLSV arrived in Jiangsu province from Huaiyangshan, Jiangsu Province became another source for the spread of the disease. Bayesian factor test analysis identified three major transmission routes: Huaiyangshan to Jiangsu, Jiangsu to Liaoning, and Jiangsu to Shandong. The speed of FTLSV movement has increased in recent decades, likely facilitated by modern human activity and ecosystem changes. In addition, evidence of RNA segment reassortment was found in FTLSV; purifying selection appears to have been the dominant force in the evolution of this virus.

Conclusion: Results presented in the manuscript suggest that the Huaiyangshan area is likely be the origin of FTLSV in China and identified probable viral migration routes. These results provide new insights into the origin and spread of FTLSV in China, and provide a foundation for future virological surveillance and control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus