Limits...
Mechanical properties of cranial bones and sutures in 1-2-year-old infants.

Wang J, Zou D, Li Z, Huang P, Li D, Shao Y, Wang H, Chen Y - Med. Sci. Monit. (2014)

Bottom Line: No differences were found between the coronal and sagittal sutures in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain (P>0.05).There was no significant difference in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain between the sagittal and coronal sutures.However, there were significant differences in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain between the frontal and parietal bones as well as between the cranial bones and sutures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forensic Science, Basic Medical College, Southern Medical University, Shanghai, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanical properties of 1-2-year-old pediatric cranial bones and sutures and their influential factors were studied to better understand how the pediatric calvarium reacts to loading.

Material and methods: Cranial bone and suture specimens were extracted from seven fresh-frozen human infant cadavers (1.5±0.5 years old). Eight specimens were obtained from each subject: two frontal bones, two parietal bones, two sagittal suture samples, and two coronal suture samples. The specimens were tested in a three-point bend setup at 1.5 mm/s. The mechanical properties, such as ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain, were calculated for each specimen.

Results: The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal bone were higher than those of the parietal bone (P<0.05). No differences were found between the coronal and sagittal sutures in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain (P>0.05). The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal and parietal bones were higher than those of the sagittal and coronal sutures (P<0.05), whereas the opposite ultimate strain findings were revealed (P<0.05).

Conclusions: There was no significant difference in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain between the sagittal and coronal sutures. However, there were significant differences in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain between the frontal and parietal bones as well as between the cranial bones and sutures.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic indicating the locations of the pediatric cranial bone and suture specimens. Two parietal bone and two frontal bone specimens were removed from the skull along with two parietal-parietal sutures (sagittal suture) and two frontal-frontal sutures (coronal suture, superior view).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199403&req=5

f1-medscimonit-20-1808: Schematic indicating the locations of the pediatric cranial bone and suture specimens. Two parietal bone and two frontal bone specimens were removed from the skull along with two parietal-parietal sutures (sagittal suture) and two frontal-frontal sutures (coronal suture, superior view).

Mentions: Human infant cranial bones and sutures were obtained from seven fresh-frozen human infant cadavers (females, three; males, four; 1.5±0.5 years old). All materials were thoroughly examined to ensure a lack of skull fractures and malformations and refrigerated at −20°C until the preparation and testing, thus minimizing the number of freeze-thaw cycles to prevent bone damage. We then thawed out the subjects in saline no more than 6 hours before the experiment. Eight specimens (6 cm long, 1 cm wide) were obtained from each subject: two FB, two PB, two parietal–parietal suture (sagittal sutures) samples, and two parietal–frontal suture (coronal sutures) samples. The latter two contained suture and bone. We used a vertical band saw and gently filed the cut faces to ensure accurate dimensions. The positions and directions of the samples from the eight skulls were kept as uniform as possible to allow for realistic future comparisons (Figure 1). The thickness of each suture was measured using a vernier caliper. The width and thickness of each test specimen were measured adjacent to the cross-section where the fracture occurred.


Mechanical properties of cranial bones and sutures in 1-2-year-old infants.

Wang J, Zou D, Li Z, Huang P, Li D, Shao Y, Wang H, Chen Y - Med. Sci. Monit. (2014)

Schematic indicating the locations of the pediatric cranial bone and suture specimens. Two parietal bone and two frontal bone specimens were removed from the skull along with two parietal-parietal sutures (sagittal suture) and two frontal-frontal sutures (coronal suture, superior view).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199403&req=5

f1-medscimonit-20-1808: Schematic indicating the locations of the pediatric cranial bone and suture specimens. Two parietal bone and two frontal bone specimens were removed from the skull along with two parietal-parietal sutures (sagittal suture) and two frontal-frontal sutures (coronal suture, superior view).
Mentions: Human infant cranial bones and sutures were obtained from seven fresh-frozen human infant cadavers (females, three; males, four; 1.5±0.5 years old). All materials were thoroughly examined to ensure a lack of skull fractures and malformations and refrigerated at −20°C until the preparation and testing, thus minimizing the number of freeze-thaw cycles to prevent bone damage. We then thawed out the subjects in saline no more than 6 hours before the experiment. Eight specimens (6 cm long, 1 cm wide) were obtained from each subject: two FB, two PB, two parietal–parietal suture (sagittal sutures) samples, and two parietal–frontal suture (coronal sutures) samples. The latter two contained suture and bone. We used a vertical band saw and gently filed the cut faces to ensure accurate dimensions. The positions and directions of the samples from the eight skulls were kept as uniform as possible to allow for realistic future comparisons (Figure 1). The thickness of each suture was measured using a vernier caliper. The width and thickness of each test specimen were measured adjacent to the cross-section where the fracture occurred.

Bottom Line: No differences were found between the coronal and sagittal sutures in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain (P>0.05).There was no significant difference in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain between the sagittal and coronal sutures.However, there were significant differences in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain between the frontal and parietal bones as well as between the cranial bones and sutures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forensic Science, Basic Medical College, Southern Medical University, Shanghai, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanical properties of 1-2-year-old pediatric cranial bones and sutures and their influential factors were studied to better understand how the pediatric calvarium reacts to loading.

Material and methods: Cranial bone and suture specimens were extracted from seven fresh-frozen human infant cadavers (1.5±0.5 years old). Eight specimens were obtained from each subject: two frontal bones, two parietal bones, two sagittal suture samples, and two coronal suture samples. The specimens were tested in a three-point bend setup at 1.5 mm/s. The mechanical properties, such as ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain, were calculated for each specimen.

Results: The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal bone were higher than those of the parietal bone (P<0.05). No differences were found between the coronal and sagittal sutures in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain (P>0.05). The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal and parietal bones were higher than those of the sagittal and coronal sutures (P<0.05), whereas the opposite ultimate strain findings were revealed (P<0.05).

Conclusions: There was no significant difference in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain between the sagittal and coronal sutures. However, there were significant differences in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain between the frontal and parietal bones as well as between the cranial bones and sutures.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus