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Three-dimensional analysis of the early development of the dentition.

Peterkova R, Hovorakova M, Peterka M, Lesot H - Aust Dent J (2014)

Bottom Line: The combination of in situ hybridization and 3D reconstruction have demonstrated the temporo-spatial dynamics of the signalling centres that reflect transient existence of rudimentary tooth primordia at loci where teeth were present in ancestors.The rudiments can rescue their suppressed development and revitalize, and then their subsequent autonomous development can give rise to oral pathologies.This shows that tooth-forming potential in mammals can be greater than that observed from their functional dentitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Teratology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.

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Developing dentition and oral vestibule in humans and their comparison with developing teeth in fish. (a) Embryological textbooks present two parallel U-shaped ridges in human embryos: DL – dental lamina (giving rise to the primary dentition) and VL – vestibular lamina or labio-gingival band (where the oral vestibule will form). (b-c) Summarization of data by 3D reconstructions showing that no continuous vestibular lamina exists. Instead, a set of discontinuous epithelial structures (ridges and bulges) transiently occurs externally to the dental epithelium. Red – dental epithelium. Yellow or blue – vestibular epithelium. c, m1, m2 – the deciduous canine, first and second molar, respectively. AC – the accessory cap-shaped structure (modified according to the refs25,44). (d) The schematic pattern of tooth rows (‘Zahnreihen’) in fishes. The empty rings and black spots indicate the older and younger teeth respectively, new teeth are formed at the posterior end of each Zahnreihen (modified according to the ref.161). (e) Dental and vestibular epithelia in an 8-week-old human embryonic maxilla in a 3D reconstruction viewed from the mesenchymal aspect. Note the reiterative fusions (white asterisks) between the dental epithelium and particular ridges of the vestibular epithelium. c, m1 – the deciduous canine and the first molar, respectively.
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fig09: Developing dentition and oral vestibule in humans and their comparison with developing teeth in fish. (a) Embryological textbooks present two parallel U-shaped ridges in human embryos: DL – dental lamina (giving rise to the primary dentition) and VL – vestibular lamina or labio-gingival band (where the oral vestibule will form). (b-c) Summarization of data by 3D reconstructions showing that no continuous vestibular lamina exists. Instead, a set of discontinuous epithelial structures (ridges and bulges) transiently occurs externally to the dental epithelium. Red – dental epithelium. Yellow or blue – vestibular epithelium. c, m1, m2 – the deciduous canine, first and second molar, respectively. AC – the accessory cap-shaped structure (modified according to the refs25,44). (d) The schematic pattern of tooth rows (‘Zahnreihen’) in fishes. The empty rings and black spots indicate the older and younger teeth respectively, new teeth are formed at the posterior end of each Zahnreihen (modified according to the ref.161). (e) Dental and vestibular epithelia in an 8-week-old human embryonic maxilla in a 3D reconstruction viewed from the mesenchymal aspect. Note the reiterative fusions (white asterisks) between the dental epithelium and particular ridges of the vestibular epithelium. c, m1 – the deciduous canine and the first molar, respectively.

Mentions: According to embryological textbooks, the dental lamina is a U-shaped epithelial ridge in the embryonic upper or lower jaws arches; another U-shaped ridge, called vestibular lamina, runs in parallel and externally to the dental lamina (Fig. 9a). The vestibular lamina (the ‘lip-furrow band’ or ‘labio-gingival ridge’) is regarded as the origin of the oral vestibule, a free space between jaws bearing teeth on one side and the lips or cheeks on the other side.


Three-dimensional analysis of the early development of the dentition.

Peterkova R, Hovorakova M, Peterka M, Lesot H - Aust Dent J (2014)

Developing dentition and oral vestibule in humans and their comparison with developing teeth in fish. (a) Embryological textbooks present two parallel U-shaped ridges in human embryos: DL – dental lamina (giving rise to the primary dentition) and VL – vestibular lamina or labio-gingival band (where the oral vestibule will form). (b-c) Summarization of data by 3D reconstructions showing that no continuous vestibular lamina exists. Instead, a set of discontinuous epithelial structures (ridges and bulges) transiently occurs externally to the dental epithelium. Red – dental epithelium. Yellow or blue – vestibular epithelium. c, m1, m2 – the deciduous canine, first and second molar, respectively. AC – the accessory cap-shaped structure (modified according to the refs25,44). (d) The schematic pattern of tooth rows (‘Zahnreihen’) in fishes. The empty rings and black spots indicate the older and younger teeth respectively, new teeth are formed at the posterior end of each Zahnreihen (modified according to the ref.161). (e) Dental and vestibular epithelia in an 8-week-old human embryonic maxilla in a 3D reconstruction viewed from the mesenchymal aspect. Note the reiterative fusions (white asterisks) between the dental epithelium and particular ridges of the vestibular epithelium. c, m1 – the deciduous canine and the first molar, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199315&req=5

fig09: Developing dentition and oral vestibule in humans and their comparison with developing teeth in fish. (a) Embryological textbooks present two parallel U-shaped ridges in human embryos: DL – dental lamina (giving rise to the primary dentition) and VL – vestibular lamina or labio-gingival band (where the oral vestibule will form). (b-c) Summarization of data by 3D reconstructions showing that no continuous vestibular lamina exists. Instead, a set of discontinuous epithelial structures (ridges and bulges) transiently occurs externally to the dental epithelium. Red – dental epithelium. Yellow or blue – vestibular epithelium. c, m1, m2 – the deciduous canine, first and second molar, respectively. AC – the accessory cap-shaped structure (modified according to the refs25,44). (d) The schematic pattern of tooth rows (‘Zahnreihen’) in fishes. The empty rings and black spots indicate the older and younger teeth respectively, new teeth are formed at the posterior end of each Zahnreihen (modified according to the ref.161). (e) Dental and vestibular epithelia in an 8-week-old human embryonic maxilla in a 3D reconstruction viewed from the mesenchymal aspect. Note the reiterative fusions (white asterisks) between the dental epithelium and particular ridges of the vestibular epithelium. c, m1 – the deciduous canine and the first molar, respectively.
Mentions: According to embryological textbooks, the dental lamina is a U-shaped epithelial ridge in the embryonic upper or lower jaws arches; another U-shaped ridge, called vestibular lamina, runs in parallel and externally to the dental lamina (Fig. 9a). The vestibular lamina (the ‘lip-furrow band’ or ‘labio-gingival ridge’) is regarded as the origin of the oral vestibule, a free space between jaws bearing teeth on one side and the lips or cheeks on the other side.

Bottom Line: The combination of in situ hybridization and 3D reconstruction have demonstrated the temporo-spatial dynamics of the signalling centres that reflect transient existence of rudimentary tooth primordia at loci where teeth were present in ancestors.The rudiments can rescue their suppressed development and revitalize, and then their subsequent autonomous development can give rise to oral pathologies.This shows that tooth-forming potential in mammals can be greater than that observed from their functional dentitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Teratology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus