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Working memory training improves emotional states of healthy individuals.

Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Hashizume H, Sekiguchi A, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Sassa Y, Kawashima R - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, WMT reduced activity in the left posterior insula during tasks evoking negative emotion, which was related to anger.It also reduced activity in the left frontoparietal area.These findings show that WMT can reduce negative mood and provide new insight into the clinical applications of WMT, at least among subjects with preclinical-level conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University Sendai, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Working memory (WM) capacity is associated with various emotional aspects, including states of depression and stress, reactions to emotional stimuli, and regulatory behaviors. We have previously investigated the effects of WM training (WMT) on cognitive functions and brain structures. However, the effects of WMT on emotional states and related neural mechanisms among healthy young adults remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated these effects in young adults who underwent WMT or received no intervention for 4 weeks. Before and after the intervention, subjects completed self-report questionnaires related to their emotional states and underwent scanning sessions in which brain activities related to negative emotions were measured. Compared with controls, subjects who underwent WMT showed reduced anger, fatigue, and depression. Furthermore, WMT reduced activity in the left posterior insula during tasks evoking negative emotion, which was related to anger. It also reduced activity in the left frontoparietal area. These findings show that WMT can reduce negative mood and provide new insight into the clinical applications of WMT, at least among subjects with preclinical-level conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The association between brain activity related to negative emotions and anger mood state. Scatterplot showing the relationship between the POMS Anger–Hostility subscale score and the mean value for brain activity during the preintervention period in a cluster in the left posterior insula in which a significant WMT effect was observed.
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Figure 4: The association between brain activity related to negative emotions and anger mood state. Scatterplot showing the relationship between the POMS Anger–Hostility subscale score and the mean value for brain activity during the preintervention period in a cluster in the left posterior insula in which a significant WMT effect was observed.

Mentions: As expected, activity in the left posterior insula cluster was significantly and positively correlated with the POMS anger/hostility subscale score (P = 0.019, t = 2.38; effect size r = 0.228, Figure 4); however, no significant associations were observed with the STAXI State Anger scale score; there was no evidence of outliers in the scatterplot. This correlation remained significant after excluding the 16 abovementioned subjects who only took part in the cross-sectional experiment (P = 0.039). The difference could be due to the higher sensitivity for POMS. No other psychological variables, including each POMS subscale score, showed significant correlations with activity. In addition, no significant correlations were observed when the dependent variable was activity in the left frontoparietal cluster.


Working memory training improves emotional states of healthy individuals.

Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Hashizume H, Sekiguchi A, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Sassa Y, Kawashima R - Front Syst Neurosci (2014)

The association between brain activity related to negative emotions and anger mood state. Scatterplot showing the relationship between the POMS Anger–Hostility subscale score and the mean value for brain activity during the preintervention period in a cluster in the left posterior insula in which a significant WMT effect was observed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199268&req=5

Figure 4: The association between brain activity related to negative emotions and anger mood state. Scatterplot showing the relationship between the POMS Anger–Hostility subscale score and the mean value for brain activity during the preintervention period in a cluster in the left posterior insula in which a significant WMT effect was observed.
Mentions: As expected, activity in the left posterior insula cluster was significantly and positively correlated with the POMS anger/hostility subscale score (P = 0.019, t = 2.38; effect size r = 0.228, Figure 4); however, no significant associations were observed with the STAXI State Anger scale score; there was no evidence of outliers in the scatterplot. This correlation remained significant after excluding the 16 abovementioned subjects who only took part in the cross-sectional experiment (P = 0.039). The difference could be due to the higher sensitivity for POMS. No other psychological variables, including each POMS subscale score, showed significant correlations with activity. In addition, no significant correlations were observed when the dependent variable was activity in the left frontoparietal cluster.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, WMT reduced activity in the left posterior insula during tasks evoking negative emotion, which was related to anger.It also reduced activity in the left frontoparietal area.These findings show that WMT can reduce negative mood and provide new insight into the clinical applications of WMT, at least among subjects with preclinical-level conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University Sendai, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Working memory (WM) capacity is associated with various emotional aspects, including states of depression and stress, reactions to emotional stimuli, and regulatory behaviors. We have previously investigated the effects of WM training (WMT) on cognitive functions and brain structures. However, the effects of WMT on emotional states and related neural mechanisms among healthy young adults remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated these effects in young adults who underwent WMT or received no intervention for 4 weeks. Before and after the intervention, subjects completed self-report questionnaires related to their emotional states and underwent scanning sessions in which brain activities related to negative emotions were measured. Compared with controls, subjects who underwent WMT showed reduced anger, fatigue, and depression. Furthermore, WMT reduced activity in the left posterior insula during tasks evoking negative emotion, which was related to anger. It also reduced activity in the left frontoparietal area. These findings show that WMT can reduce negative mood and provide new insight into the clinical applications of WMT, at least among subjects with preclinical-level conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus