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A study of insulin resistance and its clinico-metabolic associations among apparently healthy individuals attending a tertiary care hospital.

Banerjee R, Ray K, Bhattacherjee S, Guha S, Banerjee I, Nath I - Ann Med Health Sci Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The present study was undertaken to determine the magnitude of IR and associated clinico-metabolic risk factors among the out-patients of a tertiary care hospital in Bihar, India.The optimal cut-off value to detect IR by HOMA2-IR was 1.35.IR was found to have a strong association with various clinico-metabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, Siliguri, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Insulin resistance (IR), as a result of unhealthy life-styles and westernization, most likely contributes to the increased incidence of metabolic abnormalities and consequently, the development of metabolic syndrome (MS).

Aim: The present study was undertaken to determine the magnitude of IR and associated clinico-metabolic risk factors among the out-patients of a tertiary care hospital in Bihar, India.

Subjects and methods: Anthropometric profile, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP) and C-peptide of 112 individuals were measured using the standard procedures. IR was assessed using the homeostasis model (Homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]-IR).

Results: The mean IR was 1.5 (1.0). Individuals with MS, higher body mass index and CRP ≥6 mg/l had higher IR. Linear regression showed, among the components of MS, waist circumference had the highest contribution toward IR. The optimal cut-off value to detect IR by HOMA2-IR was 1.35.

Conclusion: IR was found to have a strong association with various clinico-metabolic risk factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Receiver operating characteristics curve of homeostatic model assessment 2 insulin resistance to predict insulin resistance
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Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristics curve of homeostatic model assessment 2 insulin resistance to predict insulin resistance

Mentions: Figure 1 shows that HOMA2-IR index presented area under the curve of 0.834 with overlapping 95% CI of 0.758-0.909. Using the ROC curve analysis the optimal value for sensitivity and specificity that keep (1 − sensitivity) + (1 − specificity) at minimum was 1.35. Sensitivity and specificity were 90.2% and 71.8%, respectively.


A study of insulin resistance and its clinico-metabolic associations among apparently healthy individuals attending a tertiary care hospital.

Banerjee R, Ray K, Bhattacherjee S, Guha S, Banerjee I, Nath I - Ann Med Health Sci Res (2014)

Receiver operating characteristics curve of homeostatic model assessment 2 insulin resistance to predict insulin resistance
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4199182&req=5

Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristics curve of homeostatic model assessment 2 insulin resistance to predict insulin resistance
Mentions: Figure 1 shows that HOMA2-IR index presented area under the curve of 0.834 with overlapping 95% CI of 0.758-0.909. Using the ROC curve analysis the optimal value for sensitivity and specificity that keep (1 − sensitivity) + (1 − specificity) at minimum was 1.35. Sensitivity and specificity were 90.2% and 71.8%, respectively.

Bottom Line: The present study was undertaken to determine the magnitude of IR and associated clinico-metabolic risk factors among the out-patients of a tertiary care hospital in Bihar, India.The optimal cut-off value to detect IR by HOMA2-IR was 1.35.IR was found to have a strong association with various clinico-metabolic risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, Siliguri, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Insulin resistance (IR), as a result of unhealthy life-styles and westernization, most likely contributes to the increased incidence of metabolic abnormalities and consequently, the development of metabolic syndrome (MS).

Aim: The present study was undertaken to determine the magnitude of IR and associated clinico-metabolic risk factors among the out-patients of a tertiary care hospital in Bihar, India.

Subjects and methods: Anthropometric profile, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP) and C-peptide of 112 individuals were measured using the standard procedures. IR was assessed using the homeostasis model (Homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]-IR).

Results: The mean IR was 1.5 (1.0). Individuals with MS, higher body mass index and CRP ≥6 mg/l had higher IR. Linear regression showed, among the components of MS, waist circumference had the highest contribution toward IR. The optimal cut-off value to detect IR by HOMA2-IR was 1.35.

Conclusion: IR was found to have a strong association with various clinico-metabolic risk factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus