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Creating an interest in research and development as a means of reducing the gap between theory and practice in primary care: an interventional study based on strategic communication.

Morténius H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way.Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed.Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research and Development, Halland Hospital Halmstad, Region Halland, SE-301 80 Halmstad, Sweden. helena.mortenius@regionhalland.se.

ABSTRACT
Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D). For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals' interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals' interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276) in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Impact of the direct (D) and indirect communication (ID) communication channels on the creation of interest in R&D among primary care staff measured on two occasions.
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ijerph-11-08689-f002: Impact of the direct (D) and indirect communication (ID) communication channels on the creation of interest in R&D among primary care staff measured on two occasions.

Mentions: Staff members’ own initiative to read the research bulletin was found to have the greatest impact on R&D interest on both occasions (p < 0.001). In addition, indirect communication, i.e., a colleague narrating about various R&D projects (p < 0.001), a scientific seminar (p < 0.001) and an annual research conference (p < 0.01), contributed substantially to individual interest in R&D (Table 2). The influence of the digital channels was negligible despite the fact that the results were significant on both occasions (p < 0.001) (Table 2). When occasions I and II were analysed, the channels’ contributions in terms of creating an interest in R&D were more or less the same (Figure 2).


Creating an interest in research and development as a means of reducing the gap between theory and practice in primary care: an interventional study based on strategic communication.

Morténius H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Impact of the direct (D) and indirect communication (ID) communication channels on the creation of interest in R&D among primary care staff measured on two occasions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4198986&req=5

ijerph-11-08689-f002: Impact of the direct (D) and indirect communication (ID) communication channels on the creation of interest in R&D among primary care staff measured on two occasions.
Mentions: Staff members’ own initiative to read the research bulletin was found to have the greatest impact on R&D interest on both occasions (p < 0.001). In addition, indirect communication, i.e., a colleague narrating about various R&D projects (p < 0.001), a scientific seminar (p < 0.001) and an annual research conference (p < 0.01), contributed substantially to individual interest in R&D (Table 2). The influence of the digital channels was negligible despite the fact that the results were significant on both occasions (p < 0.001) (Table 2). When occasions I and II were analysed, the channels’ contributions in terms of creating an interest in R&D were more or less the same (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way.Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed.Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&amp;D within primary care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research and Development, Halland Hospital Halmstad, Region Halland, SE-301 80 Halmstad, Sweden. helena.mortenius@regionhalland.se.

ABSTRACT
Today, healthcare professionals are faced with the challenge of implementing research results in an optimal way. It is therefore important to create a climate that is conducive to research and development (R&D). For this reason, new strategies are required to enhance healthcare professionals' interest in innovative thinking and R&D. Strategic communication with roots in sociology, psychology and political science was employed as a means of achieving long-term behavioural change. The aim of this study was to describe, follow up and evaluate a primary care intervention based on strategic communication intended to increase healthcare professionals' interest in R&D over time. An interventional cohort study comprising all staff members (N = 1276) in a Swedish primary care area was initiated in 1997 and continued for 12 years. The intention to engage in R&D was measured on two occasions; at 7 and 12 years. Both descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were employed. The results demonstrated that the positive attitude to R&D increased over time, representing a first step towards new thinking and willingness to change work practices for the benefit of the patient. Strategic communication has not been previously employed as a scientific tool to create a long-term interest in R&D within primary care.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus