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Cellular and Developmental Biology of TRPM7 Channel-Kinase: Implicated Roles in Cancer.

Yee NS, Kazi AA, Yee RK - Cells (2014)

Bottom Line: The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7) is a ubiquitously expressed cation-permeable ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity that plays important roles in various physiological functions.Experimental studies in model organisms, such as zebrafish, mouse, and frog, have begun to elucidate the pleiotropic roles of TRPM7 during embryonic development from gastrulation to organogenesis.Studying the functional roles of TRPM7 and the underlying mechanisms in normal cells and developmental processes is expected to help understand how TRPM7 channel-kinase contributes to pathogenesis, such as malignant neoplasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Program of Experimental Therapeutics, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Penn State Milton S, Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. nyee@hmc.psu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7) is a ubiquitously expressed cation-permeable ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity that plays important roles in various physiological functions. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies, in combination with molecular analyses of TRPM7, have generated insights into its functions as a cellular sensor and transducer of physicochemical stimuli. Accumulating evidence indicates that TRPM7 channel-kinase is essential for cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, growth, and migration. Experimental studies in model organisms, such as zebrafish, mouse, and frog, have begun to elucidate the pleiotropic roles of TRPM7 during embryonic development from gastrulation to organogenesis. Aberrant expression and/or activity of the TRPM7 channel-kinase have been implicated in human diseases including a variety of cancer. Studying the functional roles of TRPM7 and the underlying mechanisms in normal cells and developmental processes is expected to help understand how TRPM7 channel-kinase contributes to pathogenesis, such as malignant neoplasia. On the other hand, studies of TRPM7 in diseases, particularly cancer, will help shed new light in the normal functions of TRPM7 under physiological conditions. In this article, we will provide an updated review of the structural features and biological functions of TRPM7, present a summary of current knowledge of its roles in development and cancer, and discuss the potential of TRPM7 as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target in malignant diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A working model of the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7.
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cells-03-00751-f002: A working model of the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7.

Mentions: Accumulating evidence has begun to reveal the signaling mechanisms that mediate the cellular functions of TRPM7. Depending on the cell types, the TRPM7-regulated biological functions involve interactions and modulations of the signaling pathways induced by mitogens, stress, and inflammatory cytokines. On the basis of the current evidence, a working model for the signaling mechanism of TRPM7 channel-kinase is proposed (Figure 2). In this model, the TRPM7 channel-kinase acts as a cellular sensor of the physical and chemical stimuli such as mechanical stretch, oxidative stress, changes in cell volume or osmolar gradient, and alterations in extracellular or cytosolic pH. It also acts as a signal transducer by controlling ionic fluxes and modulating the mitogen- and cytokine-induced signaling pathways. However, continued studies are indicated to decipher the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7 in each cell type under various physiological and pathological conditions.


Cellular and Developmental Biology of TRPM7 Channel-Kinase: Implicated Roles in Cancer.

Yee NS, Kazi AA, Yee RK - Cells (2014)

A working model of the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197629&req=5

cells-03-00751-f002: A working model of the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7.
Mentions: Accumulating evidence has begun to reveal the signaling mechanisms that mediate the cellular functions of TRPM7. Depending on the cell types, the TRPM7-regulated biological functions involve interactions and modulations of the signaling pathways induced by mitogens, stress, and inflammatory cytokines. On the basis of the current evidence, a working model for the signaling mechanism of TRPM7 channel-kinase is proposed (Figure 2). In this model, the TRPM7 channel-kinase acts as a cellular sensor of the physical and chemical stimuli such as mechanical stretch, oxidative stress, changes in cell volume or osmolar gradient, and alterations in extracellular or cytosolic pH. It also acts as a signal transducer by controlling ionic fluxes and modulating the mitogen- and cytokine-induced signaling pathways. However, continued studies are indicated to decipher the signaling mechanisms that mediate the functional roles of TRPM7 in each cell type under various physiological and pathological conditions.

Bottom Line: The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7) is a ubiquitously expressed cation-permeable ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity that plays important roles in various physiological functions.Experimental studies in model organisms, such as zebrafish, mouse, and frog, have begun to elucidate the pleiotropic roles of TRPM7 during embryonic development from gastrulation to organogenesis.Studying the functional roles of TRPM7 and the underlying mechanisms in normal cells and developmental processes is expected to help understand how TRPM7 channel-kinase contributes to pathogenesis, such as malignant neoplasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Program of Experimental Therapeutics, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Penn State Milton S, Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. nyee@hmc.psu.edu.

ABSTRACT
The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7) is a ubiquitously expressed cation-permeable ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity that plays important roles in various physiological functions. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies, in combination with molecular analyses of TRPM7, have generated insights into its functions as a cellular sensor and transducer of physicochemical stimuli. Accumulating evidence indicates that TRPM7 channel-kinase is essential for cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, growth, and migration. Experimental studies in model organisms, such as zebrafish, mouse, and frog, have begun to elucidate the pleiotropic roles of TRPM7 during embryonic development from gastrulation to organogenesis. Aberrant expression and/or activity of the TRPM7 channel-kinase have been implicated in human diseases including a variety of cancer. Studying the functional roles of TRPM7 and the underlying mechanisms in normal cells and developmental processes is expected to help understand how TRPM7 channel-kinase contributes to pathogenesis, such as malignant neoplasia. On the other hand, studies of TRPM7 in diseases, particularly cancer, will help shed new light in the normal functions of TRPM7 under physiological conditions. In this article, we will provide an updated review of the structural features and biological functions of TRPM7, present a summary of current knowledge of its roles in development and cancer, and discuss the potential of TRPM7 as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target in malignant diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus