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Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

Booth DT - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking.Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke.The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia d.booth@uq.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Traces of force production and mean front flipper tip position (in degrees) and stroke rate (strokes per minute SPM) during three different time intervals for a green turtle hatchling (28.6 g, CL 51.4 mm, CW 37.4 mm) exhibiting the biphasic force producing swimming style.Heavy lines in the flipper position trace indicate times when the thrust force was increasing.
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f04: Traces of force production and mean front flipper tip position (in degrees) and stroke rate (strokes per minute SPM) during three different time intervals for a green turtle hatchling (28.6 g, CL 51.4 mm, CW 37.4 mm) exhibiting the biphasic force producing swimming style.Heavy lines in the flipper position trace indicate times when the thrust force was increasing.

Mentions: All tethered hatchlings swam at or just below the water's surface and the tips of their flippers frequently broke the water's surface during powerstroking bouts. Power strokes involve extremely complicated 3-dimensional movement of the front flippers, including rotation of the blade angle, flexing of distal ends of flippers, anterior-dorsal bending and dorsal-ventral movement of flippers as well as the body pitching and heaving up and down within the water column (supplementary material Movie 2). The videos were not of sufficiently high resolution to comprehensively analyse this extremely complex flipper movement, but as a first, highly simplified analysis, the up and down flipper sweep angle was quantitatively assessed. All videos indicated similar up and down flipper movement, and because of the extremely laborious task of quantifying the flipper angles every 0.01 s during swimming only two typical hatchlings were quantitatively analysed at three separate time periods: within the first minute of being placed in the water, after one hour of swimming and after 16 hours of swimming (Figs 3, 4).


Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

Booth DT - Biol Open (2014)

Traces of force production and mean front flipper tip position (in degrees) and stroke rate (strokes per minute SPM) during three different time intervals for a green turtle hatchling (28.6 g, CL 51.4 mm, CW 37.4 mm) exhibiting the biphasic force producing swimming style.Heavy lines in the flipper position trace indicate times when the thrust force was increasing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197437&req=5

f04: Traces of force production and mean front flipper tip position (in degrees) and stroke rate (strokes per minute SPM) during three different time intervals for a green turtle hatchling (28.6 g, CL 51.4 mm, CW 37.4 mm) exhibiting the biphasic force producing swimming style.Heavy lines in the flipper position trace indicate times when the thrust force was increasing.
Mentions: All tethered hatchlings swam at or just below the water's surface and the tips of their flippers frequently broke the water's surface during powerstroking bouts. Power strokes involve extremely complicated 3-dimensional movement of the front flippers, including rotation of the blade angle, flexing of distal ends of flippers, anterior-dorsal bending and dorsal-ventral movement of flippers as well as the body pitching and heaving up and down within the water column (supplementary material Movie 2). The videos were not of sufficiently high resolution to comprehensively analyse this extremely complex flipper movement, but as a first, highly simplified analysis, the up and down flipper sweep angle was quantitatively assessed. All videos indicated similar up and down flipper movement, and because of the extremely laborious task of quantifying the flipper angles every 0.01 s during swimming only two typical hatchlings were quantitatively analysed at three separate time periods: within the first minute of being placed in the water, after one hour of swimming and after 16 hours of swimming (Figs 3, 4).

Bottom Line: Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking.Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke.The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia d.booth@uq.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus