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Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

Booth DT - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking.Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke.The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia d.booth@uq.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between (A) strokes rate during a powerstroking bout (stokes per minute SPM), (B) proportion of time spent powerstroking, and (C) the length of time an individual powerstroking bout and water speed for hatchling green turtles.Post-hoc analysis indicated that stroke rate was not significantly different at water speeds of 0.25–0.50 m/s, but was slower at 0.20 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated proportion of time spent powerstroking increased with water speed up to 0.45 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated powerstroking bout length increased at water speeds greater than 0.25 m/s.
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f02: The relationship between (A) strokes rate during a powerstroking bout (stokes per minute SPM), (B) proportion of time spent powerstroking, and (C) the length of time an individual powerstroking bout and water speed for hatchling green turtles.Post-hoc analysis indicated that stroke rate was not significantly different at water speeds of 0.25–0.50 m/s, but was slower at 0.20 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated proportion of time spent powerstroking increased with water speed up to 0.45 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated powerstroking bout length increased at water speeds greater than 0.25 m/s.

Mentions: For each hatchling at each water speed, the video was analysed for the proportion of time spent powerstroking by adding up the time of each powerstroking bout and dividing this value by the total time length of the video. These proportions were arcsin transformed before being analysed with repeated measures ANOVA. Powerstroking rate (calculated by dividing the number of strokes taken in a powerstroking bout by the time taken for that powerstroking bout) (F(6,84)  =  9.25, P < 0.001), the proportion of time spent powerstroking (F(6,84)  =  53.02, P < 0.001), and the length of time that a powerstroking bout lasted (F(6,84)  =  13.58, P < 0.0001) all increased in a non-linear manner with water speed (Fig. 2).


Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

Booth DT - Biol Open (2014)

The relationship between (A) strokes rate during a powerstroking bout (stokes per minute SPM), (B) proportion of time spent powerstroking, and (C) the length of time an individual powerstroking bout and water speed for hatchling green turtles.Post-hoc analysis indicated that stroke rate was not significantly different at water speeds of 0.25–0.50 m/s, but was slower at 0.20 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated proportion of time spent powerstroking increased with water speed up to 0.45 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated powerstroking bout length increased at water speeds greater than 0.25 m/s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197437&req=5

f02: The relationship between (A) strokes rate during a powerstroking bout (stokes per minute SPM), (B) proportion of time spent powerstroking, and (C) the length of time an individual powerstroking bout and water speed for hatchling green turtles.Post-hoc analysis indicated that stroke rate was not significantly different at water speeds of 0.25–0.50 m/s, but was slower at 0.20 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated proportion of time spent powerstroking increased with water speed up to 0.45 m/s. Post-hoc analysis indicated powerstroking bout length increased at water speeds greater than 0.25 m/s.
Mentions: For each hatchling at each water speed, the video was analysed for the proportion of time spent powerstroking by adding up the time of each powerstroking bout and dividing this value by the total time length of the video. These proportions were arcsin transformed before being analysed with repeated measures ANOVA. Powerstroking rate (calculated by dividing the number of strokes taken in a powerstroking bout by the time taken for that powerstroking bout) (F(6,84)  =  9.25, P < 0.001), the proportion of time spent powerstroking (F(6,84)  =  53.02, P < 0.001), and the length of time that a powerstroking bout lasted (F(6,84)  =  13.58, P < 0.0001) all increased in a non-linear manner with water speed (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking.Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke.The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia d.booth@uq.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus