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Immediate and punitive impact of mechanosensory disturbance on olfactory behaviour of larval Drosophila.

Saumweber T, Cano C, Klessen J, Eichler K, Fendt M, Gerber B - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: We report that (i) during 2-3 seconds after buzz onset the larvae slowed down and then turned, arguably to escape this situation; this was seen for buzz frequencies of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz, (ii) innate olfactory preference was reduced when tested in the presence of the buzz; this effect was strongest for the 100 Hz frequency, (iii) after odour-buzz associative training, we observed escape from the buzz-associated odour; this effect was apparent for 10 and 100, but not for 1000 Hz.We discuss the multiple behavioural effects of mechanosensation and stress that the immediate effects on locomotion and the impact as punishment differ in their frequency-dependence.It should be interesting to see how these features map onto the organization of sensory, ascending pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut für Biologie, Universität Leipzig, Tierphysiologie, 04103 Leipzig, Germany Abteilung Genetik von Lernen und Gedächtnis, Leibniz Institut für Neurobiologie (LIN), 39118 Magdeburg, Germany timo.saumweber@lin-magdeburg.de bertram.gerber@lin-magdeburg.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Buzz as punishment: frequency-dependence.(A) Sketch of the experimental design using buzz frequencies of 10 Hz, 100 Hz and 1000 Hz. Presenting the buzz during the test is required, because conditioned avoidance is not behaviourally expressed if there is no ‘reason’ to escape (see Introduction for rationale). (B) Associative performance indices when using buzzes at the indicated frequencies. Associative performance is observed for 10 Hz and 100 Hz, but not for 1000 Hz buzzes. * and ns refer to P<0.05/3 and P>0.05/3 (OSS-tests), respectively;  refers to P<0.05/2 (MWU-test, P<0.05/2; U = 327.0),  refers to P<0.05 (KW-test: P<0.05; H = 7.71; df = 2). From left to right, sample size is N = 32, 38, 28. (C,D) Associative performance indices when using buzzes differing in frequency between training and test. Odour-buzz memory, if established using a 100 Hz buzz, can be behaviourally expressed at 1000 Hz (C). In turn, 1000 Hz buzzes cannot function as punishment (D). * and ns indicate P<0.05 and P>0.05, respectively (OSS-tests) (N = 50, 43).
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f02: Buzz as punishment: frequency-dependence.(A) Sketch of the experimental design using buzz frequencies of 10 Hz, 100 Hz and 1000 Hz. Presenting the buzz during the test is required, because conditioned avoidance is not behaviourally expressed if there is no ‘reason’ to escape (see Introduction for rationale). (B) Associative performance indices when using buzzes at the indicated frequencies. Associative performance is observed for 10 Hz and 100 Hz, but not for 1000 Hz buzzes. * and ns refer to P<0.05/3 and P>0.05/3 (OSS-tests), respectively; refers to P<0.05/2 (MWU-test, P<0.05/2; U = 327.0), refers to P<0.05 (KW-test: P<0.05; H = 7.71; df = 2). From left to right, sample size is N = 32, 38, 28. (C,D) Associative performance indices when using buzzes differing in frequency between training and test. Odour-buzz memory, if established using a 100 Hz buzz, can be behaviourally expressed at 1000 Hz (C). In turn, 1000 Hz buzzes cannot function as punishment (D). * and ns indicate P<0.05 and P>0.05, respectively (OSS-tests) (N = 50, 43).

Mentions: Next, we asked whether the frequency of buzz punishment has an influence on associative scores (Fig. 2B; supplementary material Fig. S2B). Buzzes of 10 Hz and 100 Hz support significantly negative associative performance indices, whereas 1000 Hz buzzes did not. A relatively low frequency of 10 Hz supported the same level of associative effect as the standard 100 Hz buzz, while the scores using 1000 Hz buzzes were less relative to the 100 Hz buzz.


Immediate and punitive impact of mechanosensory disturbance on olfactory behaviour of larval Drosophila.

Saumweber T, Cano C, Klessen J, Eichler K, Fendt M, Gerber B - Biol Open (2014)

Buzz as punishment: frequency-dependence.(A) Sketch of the experimental design using buzz frequencies of 10 Hz, 100 Hz and 1000 Hz. Presenting the buzz during the test is required, because conditioned avoidance is not behaviourally expressed if there is no ‘reason’ to escape (see Introduction for rationale). (B) Associative performance indices when using buzzes at the indicated frequencies. Associative performance is observed for 10 Hz and 100 Hz, but not for 1000 Hz buzzes. * and ns refer to P<0.05/3 and P>0.05/3 (OSS-tests), respectively;  refers to P<0.05/2 (MWU-test, P<0.05/2; U = 327.0),  refers to P<0.05 (KW-test: P<0.05; H = 7.71; df = 2). From left to right, sample size is N = 32, 38, 28. (C,D) Associative performance indices when using buzzes differing in frequency between training and test. Odour-buzz memory, if established using a 100 Hz buzz, can be behaviourally expressed at 1000 Hz (C). In turn, 1000 Hz buzzes cannot function as punishment (D). * and ns indicate P<0.05 and P>0.05, respectively (OSS-tests) (N = 50, 43).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197435&req=5

f02: Buzz as punishment: frequency-dependence.(A) Sketch of the experimental design using buzz frequencies of 10 Hz, 100 Hz and 1000 Hz. Presenting the buzz during the test is required, because conditioned avoidance is not behaviourally expressed if there is no ‘reason’ to escape (see Introduction for rationale). (B) Associative performance indices when using buzzes at the indicated frequencies. Associative performance is observed for 10 Hz and 100 Hz, but not for 1000 Hz buzzes. * and ns refer to P<0.05/3 and P>0.05/3 (OSS-tests), respectively; refers to P<0.05/2 (MWU-test, P<0.05/2; U = 327.0), refers to P<0.05 (KW-test: P<0.05; H = 7.71; df = 2). From left to right, sample size is N = 32, 38, 28. (C,D) Associative performance indices when using buzzes differing in frequency between training and test. Odour-buzz memory, if established using a 100 Hz buzz, can be behaviourally expressed at 1000 Hz (C). In turn, 1000 Hz buzzes cannot function as punishment (D). * and ns indicate P<0.05 and P>0.05, respectively (OSS-tests) (N = 50, 43).
Mentions: Next, we asked whether the frequency of buzz punishment has an influence on associative scores (Fig. 2B; supplementary material Fig. S2B). Buzzes of 10 Hz and 100 Hz support significantly negative associative performance indices, whereas 1000 Hz buzzes did not. A relatively low frequency of 10 Hz supported the same level of associative effect as the standard 100 Hz buzz, while the scores using 1000 Hz buzzes were less relative to the 100 Hz buzz.

Bottom Line: We report that (i) during 2-3 seconds after buzz onset the larvae slowed down and then turned, arguably to escape this situation; this was seen for buzz frequencies of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz, (ii) innate olfactory preference was reduced when tested in the presence of the buzz; this effect was strongest for the 100 Hz frequency, (iii) after odour-buzz associative training, we observed escape from the buzz-associated odour; this effect was apparent for 10 and 100, but not for 1000 Hz.We discuss the multiple behavioural effects of mechanosensation and stress that the immediate effects on locomotion and the impact as punishment differ in their frequency-dependence.It should be interesting to see how these features map onto the organization of sensory, ascending pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut für Biologie, Universität Leipzig, Tierphysiologie, 04103 Leipzig, Germany Abteilung Genetik von Lernen und Gedächtnis, Leibniz Institut für Neurobiologie (LIN), 39118 Magdeburg, Germany timo.saumweber@lin-magdeburg.de bertram.gerber@lin-magdeburg.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus