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Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma.

Alazzawi S, Shahrizal T, Prepageran N, Pailoor J - Qatar Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection.Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements.Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scan (with contrast) showing sphenoid sinus lesion with calcification.
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fig1: CT scan (with contrast) showing sphenoid sinus lesion with calcification.

Mentions: A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed at the emergency unit prior to her referral to our clinic which revealed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus causing expansion of the sinus. The mass showed calcifications with minimal enhancement (Figure 1). A sphenoid sinus tumor was suspected and therefore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out. This revealed the same findings with those of the CT scan, with no obvious intracranial extension.


Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma.

Alazzawi S, Shahrizal T, Prepageran N, Pailoor J - Qatar Med J (2014)

CT scan (with contrast) showing sphenoid sinus lesion with calcification.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197375&req=5

fig1: CT scan (with contrast) showing sphenoid sinus lesion with calcification.
Mentions: A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed at the emergency unit prior to her referral to our clinic which revealed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus causing expansion of the sinus. The mass showed calcifications with minimal enhancement (Figure 1). A sphenoid sinus tumor was suspected and therefore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out. This revealed the same findings with those of the CT scan, with no obvious intracranial extension.

Bottom Line: An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection.Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements.Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus