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Recurrent bilateral breast abscess due to nontuberculous mycobacterial infection.

Yoo H, Choi SH, Kim YJ, Kim SJ, Cho YU, Choi SJ - J Breast Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Since recurrent bilateral breast infection due to nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is rare, its diagnosis is easily overlooked; in addition, complete recovery is often difficult to achieve.We report a case of recurrent bilateral infection in a 35-year-old woman who had completed treatment for NTM.Although various infectious diseases show similar clinical conditions and imaging findings, recurrences should raise suspicion of NTM infection, and this possibility should be considered in differential diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Since recurrent bilateral breast infection due to nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is rare, its diagnosis is easily overlooked; in addition, complete recovery is often difficult to achieve. We report a case of recurrent bilateral infection in a 35-year-old woman who had completed treatment for NTM. Although various infectious diseases show similar clinical conditions and imaging findings, recurrences should raise suspicion of NTM infection, and this possibility should be considered in differential diagnoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic resonance imaging: sagittal view of the left breast. (A) Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging shows an ill-defined and partially multilobular contoured lesion with rim-like enhancement in the subareolar area of the left breast (arrowheads) with additional diffuse parenchymal enhancement. The lesion (arrowheads) visible in the subareolar area correlates to the lesion detected by B-mode gray scale ultrasonography (Figure 1). This lesion appeared to be an abscess consistent with mastitis (1.5-T MR scanner, 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted Gradient Echo Sequences; contrast injection of 0.2 mL/kg gadodiamide [OmniscanTM; GE Healthcare] was administered by manually followed by a 20-mL saline flush). (B) T2-weighted image showing high signal intensity diffuse edematous changes with skin thickening (arrows) and an ill-defined high signal intensity lesion in the subareolar area (arrowhead), correlated with the lesion with rim-like enhancement.
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Figure 2: Magnetic resonance imaging: sagittal view of the left breast. (A) Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging shows an ill-defined and partially multilobular contoured lesion with rim-like enhancement in the subareolar area of the left breast (arrowheads) with additional diffuse parenchymal enhancement. The lesion (arrowheads) visible in the subareolar area correlates to the lesion detected by B-mode gray scale ultrasonography (Figure 1). This lesion appeared to be an abscess consistent with mastitis (1.5-T MR scanner, 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted Gradient Echo Sequences; contrast injection of 0.2 mL/kg gadodiamide [OmniscanTM; GE Healthcare] was administered by manually followed by a 20-mL saline flush). (B) T2-weighted image showing high signal intensity diffuse edematous changes with skin thickening (arrows) and an ill-defined high signal intensity lesion in the subareolar area (arrowhead), correlated with the lesion with rim-like enhancement.

Mentions: The patient also underwent bilateral dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the affected breast to further evaluate the extent of the lesion and the potential for hidden malignancies (Figure 2). Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 2.4×2.4 cm iso- to high-signal intense mass on T2 WI and iso-intense on T1 WI, which showed peripheral rim enhancement after contrast injection. Associated findings included diffuse parenchymal enhancement of the upper outer to central portion of the left breast with thickening of the overlying skin. This lesion appeared to be an abscess associated with mastitis.


Recurrent bilateral breast abscess due to nontuberculous mycobacterial infection.

Yoo H, Choi SH, Kim YJ, Kim SJ, Cho YU, Choi SJ - J Breast Cancer (2014)

Magnetic resonance imaging: sagittal view of the left breast. (A) Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging shows an ill-defined and partially multilobular contoured lesion with rim-like enhancement in the subareolar area of the left breast (arrowheads) with additional diffuse parenchymal enhancement. The lesion (arrowheads) visible in the subareolar area correlates to the lesion detected by B-mode gray scale ultrasonography (Figure 1). This lesion appeared to be an abscess consistent with mastitis (1.5-T MR scanner, 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted Gradient Echo Sequences; contrast injection of 0.2 mL/kg gadodiamide [OmniscanTM; GE Healthcare] was administered by manually followed by a 20-mL saline flush). (B) T2-weighted image showing high signal intensity diffuse edematous changes with skin thickening (arrows) and an ill-defined high signal intensity lesion in the subareolar area (arrowhead), correlated with the lesion with rim-like enhancement.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197362&req=5

Figure 2: Magnetic resonance imaging: sagittal view of the left breast. (A) Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging shows an ill-defined and partially multilobular contoured lesion with rim-like enhancement in the subareolar area of the left breast (arrowheads) with additional diffuse parenchymal enhancement. The lesion (arrowheads) visible in the subareolar area correlates to the lesion detected by B-mode gray scale ultrasonography (Figure 1). This lesion appeared to be an abscess consistent with mastitis (1.5-T MR scanner, 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted Gradient Echo Sequences; contrast injection of 0.2 mL/kg gadodiamide [OmniscanTM; GE Healthcare] was administered by manually followed by a 20-mL saline flush). (B) T2-weighted image showing high signal intensity diffuse edematous changes with skin thickening (arrows) and an ill-defined high signal intensity lesion in the subareolar area (arrowhead), correlated with the lesion with rim-like enhancement.
Mentions: The patient also underwent bilateral dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the affected breast to further evaluate the extent of the lesion and the potential for hidden malignancies (Figure 2). Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 2.4×2.4 cm iso- to high-signal intense mass on T2 WI and iso-intense on T1 WI, which showed peripheral rim enhancement after contrast injection. Associated findings included diffuse parenchymal enhancement of the upper outer to central portion of the left breast with thickening of the overlying skin. This lesion appeared to be an abscess associated with mastitis.

Bottom Line: Since recurrent bilateral breast infection due to nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is rare, its diagnosis is easily overlooked; in addition, complete recovery is often difficult to achieve.We report a case of recurrent bilateral infection in a 35-year-old woman who had completed treatment for NTM.Although various infectious diseases show similar clinical conditions and imaging findings, recurrences should raise suspicion of NTM infection, and this possibility should be considered in differential diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Since recurrent bilateral breast infection due to nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is rare, its diagnosis is easily overlooked; in addition, complete recovery is often difficult to achieve. We report a case of recurrent bilateral infection in a 35-year-old woman who had completed treatment for NTM. Although various infectious diseases show similar clinical conditions and imaging findings, recurrences should raise suspicion of NTM infection, and this possibility should be considered in differential diagnoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus