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Changes in talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics of barefoot versus shod forefoot landing.

Fukano M, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited.Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15, Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Synergetic talocrural and subtalar joint movements allow adaptation to different footwear and/or surface conditions. Therefore, knowledge of kinematic differences between barefoot and shod conditions is valuable for the study of adaptations to footwear conditions. The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.

Methods: Seven healthy participants (4 males and 3 females) participated in a landing trial under barefoot and shod conditions. Fluoroscopic images and forceplate data were collected simultaneously to calculate the talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics and the vertical ground reaction force.

Results: Upon toe contact, the plantarflexion angle of the talocrural joint during the barefoot condition was significantly larger than that during the shod condition (barefoot, 20.5 ± 7.1°, shod, 17.9 ± 8.3°, p =0.03). From toe contact to heel contact, the angular changes at the talocrural and subtalar joint were not significantly different between the barefoot and shod conditions; however, the changes in the subtalar eversion angles in the barefoot condition, from heel contact to 150 ms after toe contact, were significantly larger than those in the shod condition.

Conclusions: These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited. Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three-dimensional two-dimensional model-based registration technique. (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/).
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Fig3: Three-dimensional two-dimensional model-based registration technique. (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/).

Mentions: Three-dimensional bone positions and orientations upon landing were determined using a 3D-2D model-based registration technique that uses bone models and single-plane fluoroscopic images [21] (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/). The created bone models were projected on the distortion-corrected fluoroscopic images and were precisely adjusted, frame-by-frame, until the counter of the projected bone models matched the osseous counter in the fluoroscopic images (Figure 3). We considered the best matching contours were generated when both the overlapping all inflexion points and the conforming curves of bone models and osseous contours matched. The data were analyzed using custom-written programs (MATLAB, MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA) using standard conventions [22]. One investigator repeated this matching protocol 3 times to maintain a high operating accuracy. Measurement repeatability was assessed by repeatedly (3 times) analyzing three images, with the average differences from the mean of 0.60 mm for in-plane translations, 1.8 mm for out-of-plane rotations, and 0.59° for rotations. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the kinematics data were >0.98 for dorsi/plantarflexion, >0.78 for eversion/inversion, and >0.91 for external/internal rotation.Figure 3


Changes in talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics of barefoot versus shod forefoot landing.

Fukano M, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2014)

Three-dimensional two-dimensional model-based registration technique. (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197340&req=5

Fig3: Three-dimensional two-dimensional model-based registration technique. (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/).
Mentions: Three-dimensional bone positions and orientations upon landing were determined using a 3D-2D model-based registration technique that uses bone models and single-plane fluoroscopic images [21] (JointTrack, http://sourceforge.net/projects/jointtrack/). The created bone models were projected on the distortion-corrected fluoroscopic images and were precisely adjusted, frame-by-frame, until the counter of the projected bone models matched the osseous counter in the fluoroscopic images (Figure 3). We considered the best matching contours were generated when both the overlapping all inflexion points and the conforming curves of bone models and osseous contours matched. The data were analyzed using custom-written programs (MATLAB, MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA) using standard conventions [22]. One investigator repeated this matching protocol 3 times to maintain a high operating accuracy. Measurement repeatability was assessed by repeatedly (3 times) analyzing three images, with the average differences from the mean of 0.60 mm for in-plane translations, 1.8 mm for out-of-plane rotations, and 0.59° for rotations. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the kinematics data were >0.98 for dorsi/plantarflexion, >0.78 for eversion/inversion, and >0.91 for external/internal rotation.Figure 3

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited.Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15, Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Synergetic talocrural and subtalar joint movements allow adaptation to different footwear and/or surface conditions. Therefore, knowledge of kinematic differences between barefoot and shod conditions is valuable for the study of adaptations to footwear conditions. The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.

Methods: Seven healthy participants (4 males and 3 females) participated in a landing trial under barefoot and shod conditions. Fluoroscopic images and forceplate data were collected simultaneously to calculate the talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics and the vertical ground reaction force.

Results: Upon toe contact, the plantarflexion angle of the talocrural joint during the barefoot condition was significantly larger than that during the shod condition (barefoot, 20.5 ± 7.1°, shod, 17.9 ± 8.3°, p =0.03). From toe contact to heel contact, the angular changes at the talocrural and subtalar joint were not significantly different between the barefoot and shod conditions; however, the changes in the subtalar eversion angles in the barefoot condition, from heel contact to 150 ms after toe contact, were significantly larger than those in the shod condition.

Conclusions: These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited. Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus