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Changes in talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics of barefoot versus shod forefoot landing.

Fukano M, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited.Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15, Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Synergetic talocrural and subtalar joint movements allow adaptation to different footwear and/or surface conditions. Therefore, knowledge of kinematic differences between barefoot and shod conditions is valuable for the study of adaptations to footwear conditions. The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.

Methods: Seven healthy participants (4 males and 3 females) participated in a landing trial under barefoot and shod conditions. Fluoroscopic images and forceplate data were collected simultaneously to calculate the talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics and the vertical ground reaction force.

Results: Upon toe contact, the plantarflexion angle of the talocrural joint during the barefoot condition was significantly larger than that during the shod condition (barefoot, 20.5 ± 7.1°, shod, 17.9 ± 8.3°, p =0.03). From toe contact to heel contact, the angular changes at the talocrural and subtalar joint were not significantly different between the barefoot and shod conditions; however, the changes in the subtalar eversion angles in the barefoot condition, from heel contact to 150 ms after toe contact, were significantly larger than those in the shod condition.

Conclusions: These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited. Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Landing trial. The participants’ preparatory positions (a) and landing positions (b) are shown.
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Fig1: Landing trial. The participants’ preparatory positions (a) and landing positions (b) are shown.

Mentions: The participants were required to conduct forefoot landings with their knee extended (Figure 1). Participants stood on a platform with their left leg and their right foot extended forward and placed 10 cm above from the surface of the force plate; the landing height was limited to 10 cm because of the recording height of the equipment. Further, a landing from an approximate height of 10 cm is a common daily activity, similar to that involved in marching-in-place during aerobic exercise or descending stairs. Participants shifted their centers of gravity forward and conducted a landing 40 cm ahead of the left toe on their right foot; participants were asked to stop and remain balanced after the landing. All participants were instructed on proper landing technique and were required to practice beforehand. The participants were required to conduct a landing, while barefoot and while wearing athletic footwear (Adidas Response Cushion; Adidas, Herzogenaurach, Germany). The footwear used in this study is marketed for beginner and mid-level runners and is considered neutral-type footwear; we did not modify the footwear. The midsole material was composed of ethylene vinyl acetate and the outsole material was carbon rubber. This footwear was chosen as the test footwear because of its wide use during exercises, including walking and running. Before the experiment, the lengths of each participant’s feet were measured, in the standing position, and footwear that was 1.5 ± 0.2 cm longer than the length of their right foot was selected as the experimental footwear. Participants were required to fasten their own shoelaces.Figure 1


Changes in talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics of barefoot versus shod forefoot landing.

Fukano M, Fukubayashi T - J Foot Ankle Res (2014)

Landing trial. The participants’ preparatory positions (a) and landing positions (b) are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197340&req=5

Fig1: Landing trial. The participants’ preparatory positions (a) and landing positions (b) are shown.
Mentions: The participants were required to conduct forefoot landings with their knee extended (Figure 1). Participants stood on a platform with their left leg and their right foot extended forward and placed 10 cm above from the surface of the force plate; the landing height was limited to 10 cm because of the recording height of the equipment. Further, a landing from an approximate height of 10 cm is a common daily activity, similar to that involved in marching-in-place during aerobic exercise or descending stairs. Participants shifted their centers of gravity forward and conducted a landing 40 cm ahead of the left toe on their right foot; participants were asked to stop and remain balanced after the landing. All participants were instructed on proper landing technique and were required to practice beforehand. The participants were required to conduct a landing, while barefoot and while wearing athletic footwear (Adidas Response Cushion; Adidas, Herzogenaurach, Germany). The footwear used in this study is marketed for beginner and mid-level runners and is considered neutral-type footwear; we did not modify the footwear. The midsole material was composed of ethylene vinyl acetate and the outsole material was carbon rubber. This footwear was chosen as the test footwear because of its wide use during exercises, including walking and running. Before the experiment, the lengths of each participant’s feet were measured, in the standing position, and footwear that was 1.5 ± 0.2 cm longer than the length of their right foot was selected as the experimental footwear. Participants were required to fasten their own shoelaces.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited.Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15, Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Synergetic talocrural and subtalar joint movements allow adaptation to different footwear and/or surface conditions. Therefore, knowledge of kinematic differences between barefoot and shod conditions is valuable for the study of adaptations to footwear conditions. The objective of this study was to assess the kinematic differences in the talocrural and subtalar joints during barefoot and shod landing.

Methods: Seven healthy participants (4 males and 3 females) participated in a landing trial under barefoot and shod conditions. Fluoroscopic images and forceplate data were collected simultaneously to calculate the talocrural and subtalar joint kinematics and the vertical ground reaction force.

Results: Upon toe contact, the plantarflexion angle of the talocrural joint during the barefoot condition was significantly larger than that during the shod condition (barefoot, 20.5 ± 7.1°, shod, 17.9 ± 8.3°, p =0.03). From toe contact to heel contact, the angular changes at the talocrural and subtalar joint were not significantly different between the barefoot and shod conditions; however, the changes in the subtalar eversion angles in the barefoot condition, from heel contact to 150 ms after toe contact, were significantly larger than those in the shod condition.

Conclusions: These results suggest that footwear was able to reduce the eversion angle of the subtalar joint after heel contact during landing; the effect of wearing footwear was quite limited. Therefore, induced rearfoot kinematic alterations to prevent or manage injuries by neutral-type footwear are likely to be impractical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus