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Mental health in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: results from a large population-based study.

Sivertsen B, Petrie KJ, Wilhelmsen-Langeland A, Hysing M - BMC Endocr Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: Data were taken from the youth@hordaland study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012.We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures.There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes has previously been linked to mental health problems in adolescents, but more recent studies have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the current study was to compare symptoms of mental health problems, sleep and eating disturbances in adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in a population based sample.

Methods: Data were taken from the youth@hordaland study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012. In all, 9883 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53% girls) provided self-reported data on both diabetes and a range of instruments assessing mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention, perfectionism, resilience, sleep problems and eating behaviour.

Results: 40 adolescents were classified as having Type 1 diabetes (prevalence 0.4%). We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures.

Conclusions: This is one of the first population-based studies to examine mental health of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures. These findings contradict previous studies, and suggest that Type 1 diabetes is not associated with an increased risk of psychosocial problems.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Eating problems among adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in the youth@hordaland study. Vertical axis represents proportion of adolescents answering “true” or “partly true” on each of the 5 EDS items. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. P-values are based on Chi-squared tests, and Cohen’s d effect sizes (ES) are calculated from means and standard deviation from the EDS’ original 3 response options.
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Fig1: Eating problems among adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in the youth@hordaland study. Vertical axis represents proportion of adolescents answering “true” or “partly true” on each of the 5 EDS items. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. P-values are based on Chi-squared tests, and Cohen’s d effect sizes (ES) are calculated from means and standard deviation from the EDS’ original 3 response options.

Mentions: In terms of eating disturbances, having Type 1 diabetes was not associated with elevated scores on the EDS total score. However, as shown in Figure 1, one of the items in the EDS scale differed between the two groups: a larger proportion of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes reported needing a strict diet to control their eating compared to the non-diabetes group (effect size .31, P = .017).Figure 1


Mental health in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: results from a large population-based study.

Sivertsen B, Petrie KJ, Wilhelmsen-Langeland A, Hysing M - BMC Endocr Disord (2014)

Eating problems among adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in the youth@hordaland study. Vertical axis represents proportion of adolescents answering “true” or “partly true” on each of the 5 EDS items. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. P-values are based on Chi-squared tests, and Cohen’s d effect sizes (ES) are calculated from means and standard deviation from the EDS’ original 3 response options.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197324&req=5

Fig1: Eating problems among adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in the youth@hordaland study. Vertical axis represents proportion of adolescents answering “true” or “partly true” on each of the 5 EDS items. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. P-values are based on Chi-squared tests, and Cohen’s d effect sizes (ES) are calculated from means and standard deviation from the EDS’ original 3 response options.
Mentions: In terms of eating disturbances, having Type 1 diabetes was not associated with elevated scores on the EDS total score. However, as shown in Figure 1, one of the items in the EDS scale differed between the two groups: a larger proportion of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes reported needing a strict diet to control their eating compared to the non-diabetes group (effect size .31, P = .017).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Data were taken from the youth@hordaland study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012.We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures.There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes has previously been linked to mental health problems in adolescents, but more recent studies have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the current study was to compare symptoms of mental health problems, sleep and eating disturbances in adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in a population based sample.

Methods: Data were taken from the youth@hordaland study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012. In all, 9883 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53% girls) provided self-reported data on both diabetes and a range of instruments assessing mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention, perfectionism, resilience, sleep problems and eating behaviour.

Results: 40 adolescents were classified as having Type 1 diabetes (prevalence 0.4%). We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures.

Conclusions: This is one of the first population-based studies to examine mental health of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures. These findings contradict previous studies, and suggest that Type 1 diabetes is not associated with an increased risk of psychosocial problems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus