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Role of mesenchymal cells in the natural history of ovarian cancer: a review.

Touboul C, Vidal F, Pasquier J, Lis R, Rafii A - J Transl Med (2014)

Bottom Line: They play a role at different stages of the disease: survival and peritoneal infiltration at early stage, proliferation in distant sites, chemoresistance and recurrence at later stage.The dialogue between ovarian and mesenchymal stem cells induces the constitution of a pro-tumoral mesencrine niche.Understanding the dynamics of such interaction in a clinical setting might propose new therapeutic strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hôpital Intercommunal de Créteil, Université Paris Est, UPEC-Paris XII, 12 avenue de Verdun, 94000, Créteil, France. cyril.touboul@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynaecologic malignancy. Despite progresses in chemotherapy and ultra-radical surgeries, this locally metastatic disease presents a high rate of local recurrence advocating for the role of a peritoneal niche. For several years, it was believed that tumor initiation, progression and metastasis were merely due to the changes in the neoplastic cell population and the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues were regarded as bystanders. The importance of the tumor microenvironment and its cellular component emerged from studies on the histopathological sequence of changes at the interface between putative tumor cells and the surrounding non-neoplastic tissues during carcinogenesis.

Method: In this review we aimed to describe the pro-tumoral crosstalk between ovarian cancer and mesenchymal stem cells. A PubMed search was performed for articles published pertaining to mesenchymal stem cells and specific to ovarian cancer.

Results: Mesenchymal stem cells participate to an elaborate crosstalk through direct and paracrine interaction with ovarian cancer cells. They play a role at different stages of the disease: survival and peritoneal infiltration at early stage, proliferation in distant sites, chemoresistance and recurrence at later stage.

Conclusion: The dialogue between ovarian and mesenchymal stem cells induces the constitution of a pro-tumoral mesencrine niche. Understanding the dynamics of such interaction in a clinical setting might propose new therapeutic strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Morphological aspect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) cultivated in vitro. (A) Confocal microscopy showing intercellular interaction through Tunneling Nanotubes. (B) Optical microscopy illustrating the classical fibroblast-like shape of MSCs (×10).
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Fig1: Morphological aspect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) cultivated in vitro. (A) Confocal microscopy showing intercellular interaction through Tunneling Nanotubes. (B) Optical microscopy illustrating the classical fibroblast-like shape of MSCs (×10).

Mentions: Although they were initially described in the bone marrow [35-38], MSCs may participate to the constitution of the blood vessel walls and thus be ubiquitous cells, belonging to virtually all organs [39-41]. As a subset of pericytes, they can potentially originate from a perivascular niche [42-46]. MSCs are adherent cells that have a fibroblastic morphology (Figure 1). They are capable of forming colonies (termed colony-forming unit fibroblastic) when selected by adhering to plastic surfaces [38]. Their identification is based on diverse surface markers, including CD105, CD73, CD90, CD166, CD44 and CD29.Figure 1


Role of mesenchymal cells in the natural history of ovarian cancer: a review.

Touboul C, Vidal F, Pasquier J, Lis R, Rafii A - J Transl Med (2014)

Morphological aspect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) cultivated in vitro. (A) Confocal microscopy showing intercellular interaction through Tunneling Nanotubes. (B) Optical microscopy illustrating the classical fibroblast-like shape of MSCs (×10).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197295&req=5

Fig1: Morphological aspect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) cultivated in vitro. (A) Confocal microscopy showing intercellular interaction through Tunneling Nanotubes. (B) Optical microscopy illustrating the classical fibroblast-like shape of MSCs (×10).
Mentions: Although they were initially described in the bone marrow [35-38], MSCs may participate to the constitution of the blood vessel walls and thus be ubiquitous cells, belonging to virtually all organs [39-41]. As a subset of pericytes, they can potentially originate from a perivascular niche [42-46]. MSCs are adherent cells that have a fibroblastic morphology (Figure 1). They are capable of forming colonies (termed colony-forming unit fibroblastic) when selected by adhering to plastic surfaces [38]. Their identification is based on diverse surface markers, including CD105, CD73, CD90, CD166, CD44 and CD29.Figure 1

Bottom Line: They play a role at different stages of the disease: survival and peritoneal infiltration at early stage, proliferation in distant sites, chemoresistance and recurrence at later stage.The dialogue between ovarian and mesenchymal stem cells induces the constitution of a pro-tumoral mesencrine niche.Understanding the dynamics of such interaction in a clinical setting might propose new therapeutic strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hôpital Intercommunal de Créteil, Université Paris Est, UPEC-Paris XII, 12 avenue de Verdun, 94000, Créteil, France. cyril.touboul@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynaecologic malignancy. Despite progresses in chemotherapy and ultra-radical surgeries, this locally metastatic disease presents a high rate of local recurrence advocating for the role of a peritoneal niche. For several years, it was believed that tumor initiation, progression and metastasis were merely due to the changes in the neoplastic cell population and the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues were regarded as bystanders. The importance of the tumor microenvironment and its cellular component emerged from studies on the histopathological sequence of changes at the interface between putative tumor cells and the surrounding non-neoplastic tissues during carcinogenesis.

Method: In this review we aimed to describe the pro-tumoral crosstalk between ovarian cancer and mesenchymal stem cells. A PubMed search was performed for articles published pertaining to mesenchymal stem cells and specific to ovarian cancer.

Results: Mesenchymal stem cells participate to an elaborate crosstalk through direct and paracrine interaction with ovarian cancer cells. They play a role at different stages of the disease: survival and peritoneal infiltration at early stage, proliferation in distant sites, chemoresistance and recurrence at later stage.

Conclusion: The dialogue between ovarian and mesenchymal stem cells induces the constitution of a pro-tumoral mesencrine niche. Understanding the dynamics of such interaction in a clinical setting might propose new therapeutic strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus