Limits...
A research education program model to prepare a highly qualified workforce in biomedical and health-related research and increase diversity.

Crockett ET - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Bottom Line: Thirty-six (36) have completed their research training, and eighty percent (80%) of them have continued their research experiences beyond the program.All experiences have been positive and highly promoted.This approach has the potential to train a highly qualified workforce, change lives, enhance biomedical research, and by extension, improve national health-care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. ecrocket@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The National Institutes of Health has recognized a compelling need to train highly qualified individuals and promote diversity in the biomedical/clinical sciences research workforce. In response, we have developed a research-training program known as REPID (Research Education Program to Increase Diversity among Health Researchers) to prepare students/learners to pursue research careers in these fields and address the lack of diversity and health disparities. By inclusion of students/learners from minority and diverse backgrounds, the REPID program aims to provide a research training and enrichment experience through team mentoring to inspire students/learners to pursue research careers in biomedical and health-related fields.

Methods: Students/learners are recruited from the University campus from a diverse population of undergraduates, graduates, health professionals, and lifelong learners. Our recruits first enroll into an innovative on-line introductory course in Basics and Methods in Biomedical Research that uses a laboratory Tool-Kit (a lab in a box called the My Dr. ET Lab Tool-Kit) to receive the standard basics of research education, e.g., research skills, and lab techniques. The students/learners will also learn about the responsible conduct of research, research concept/design, data recording/analysis, and scientific writing/presentation. The course is followed by a 12-week hands-on research experience during the summer. The students/learners also attend workshops and seminars/conferences. The students/learners receive scholarship to cover stipends, research related expenses, and to attend a scientific conference.

Results: The scholarship allows the students/learners to gain knowledge and seize opportunities in biomedical and health-related careers. This is an ongoing program, and during the first three years of the program, fifty-one (51) students/learners have been recruited. Thirty-six (36) have completed their research training, and eighty percent (80%) of them have continued their research experiences beyond the program. The combination of carefully providing standard basics of research education and mentorship has been successful and instrumental for training these students/learners and their success in finding biomedical/health-related jobs and/or pursuing graduate/medical studies. All experiences have been positive and highly promoted.

Conclusions: This approach has the potential to train a highly qualified workforce, change lives, enhance biomedical research, and by extension, improve national health-care.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Mentor and mentee (Trainee) expectations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197236&req=5

Fig3: Mentor and mentee (Trainee) expectations.

Mentions: Prior to the start of the hands-on summer research experience, each trainee met with his/her mentor to complete a “Mentor-Mentee Expectations” application/agreement form and to review/discuss their research interest/projects (Figures 3 and 4 show mentor-mentee expectation and agreement forms). The goal was to assist, educate and assure the trainee of a good mentoring relationship as well as the goals and expectations for his/her summer research project. The guidelines suggested by Michigan State University, Center for Coaching & Mentoring, and other sources were adapted for the Mentor-Mentee Expectations as highlighted in Figures 3 and 4 Ref. [6–8]. Further, the trainees and mentors were provided with information and articles related to mentoring relationships [9]. During the initial mentor and mentee meeting, the program director was present and all the issues related to the program as well as mentor and mentee expectations were reviewed and discussed (Figures 3 and 4). The mentor and the mentee/trainee are encouraged to be pro-active in their relationship and should any problem arise that cannot be resolved then the program director is notified. The mentor-mentee agreement form (Figure 4) has a section about “Resolution;” which suggests means to consider if problems arise. Our program’s mentor-mentee matching has been successful so far, and among fifty-one (51) trainee- to- mentor matches we have had during the past three years of the program there was only one occasion when mentor mediation was necessary. This conflict was resolved by finding another mentor for the trainee. The success we have had so far clearly highlights the importance of finding and matching trainees with excellent mentors with a passion for training and nurturing trainees.Figure 3


A research education program model to prepare a highly qualified workforce in biomedical and health-related research and increase diversity.

Crockett ET - BMC Med Educ (2014)

Mentor and mentee (Trainee) expectations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4197236&req=5

Fig3: Mentor and mentee (Trainee) expectations.
Mentions: Prior to the start of the hands-on summer research experience, each trainee met with his/her mentor to complete a “Mentor-Mentee Expectations” application/agreement form and to review/discuss their research interest/projects (Figures 3 and 4 show mentor-mentee expectation and agreement forms). The goal was to assist, educate and assure the trainee of a good mentoring relationship as well as the goals and expectations for his/her summer research project. The guidelines suggested by Michigan State University, Center for Coaching & Mentoring, and other sources were adapted for the Mentor-Mentee Expectations as highlighted in Figures 3 and 4 Ref. [6–8]. Further, the trainees and mentors were provided with information and articles related to mentoring relationships [9]. During the initial mentor and mentee meeting, the program director was present and all the issues related to the program as well as mentor and mentee expectations were reviewed and discussed (Figures 3 and 4). The mentor and the mentee/trainee are encouraged to be pro-active in their relationship and should any problem arise that cannot be resolved then the program director is notified. The mentor-mentee agreement form (Figure 4) has a section about “Resolution;” which suggests means to consider if problems arise. Our program’s mentor-mentee matching has been successful so far, and among fifty-one (51) trainee- to- mentor matches we have had during the past three years of the program there was only one occasion when mentor mediation was necessary. This conflict was resolved by finding another mentor for the trainee. The success we have had so far clearly highlights the importance of finding and matching trainees with excellent mentors with a passion for training and nurturing trainees.Figure 3

Bottom Line: Thirty-six (36) have completed their research training, and eighty percent (80%) of them have continued their research experiences beyond the program.All experiences have been positive and highly promoted.This approach has the potential to train a highly qualified workforce, change lives, enhance biomedical research, and by extension, improve national health-care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. ecrocket@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The National Institutes of Health has recognized a compelling need to train highly qualified individuals and promote diversity in the biomedical/clinical sciences research workforce. In response, we have developed a research-training program known as REPID (Research Education Program to Increase Diversity among Health Researchers) to prepare students/learners to pursue research careers in these fields and address the lack of diversity and health disparities. By inclusion of students/learners from minority and diverse backgrounds, the REPID program aims to provide a research training and enrichment experience through team mentoring to inspire students/learners to pursue research careers in biomedical and health-related fields.

Methods: Students/learners are recruited from the University campus from a diverse population of undergraduates, graduates, health professionals, and lifelong learners. Our recruits first enroll into an innovative on-line introductory course in Basics and Methods in Biomedical Research that uses a laboratory Tool-Kit (a lab in a box called the My Dr. ET Lab Tool-Kit) to receive the standard basics of research education, e.g., research skills, and lab techniques. The students/learners will also learn about the responsible conduct of research, research concept/design, data recording/analysis, and scientific writing/presentation. The course is followed by a 12-week hands-on research experience during the summer. The students/learners also attend workshops and seminars/conferences. The students/learners receive scholarship to cover stipends, research related expenses, and to attend a scientific conference.

Results: The scholarship allows the students/learners to gain knowledge and seize opportunities in biomedical and health-related careers. This is an ongoing program, and during the first three years of the program, fifty-one (51) students/learners have been recruited. Thirty-six (36) have completed their research training, and eighty percent (80%) of them have continued their research experiences beyond the program. The combination of carefully providing standard basics of research education and mentorship has been successful and instrumental for training these students/learners and their success in finding biomedical/health-related jobs and/or pursuing graduate/medical studies. All experiences have been positive and highly promoted.

Conclusions: This approach has the potential to train a highly qualified workforce, change lives, enhance biomedical research, and by extension, improve national health-care.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus